a new initiative

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parliamentary zooming

Member
Canadian English
I am editing something that talks about a "new initiative." I think that an initiative is by definition new, so "new" is superfluous--it should just be "an initiative." Thoughts?
 
  • Proudy

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Initiative in your example "new initiative" as it relates to parliamentary zoning would be a noun. This has a different meaning than the adjective form. Check your dictionary.
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    I agree with Proudy. Initiative can mean "new thing" but it is also used to mean "program" or "enterprise." It sounds wrong, I know, but because it's possible for something to be an "old initiative" or an "initiative begun in 2001," it's also possible to describe something as a "new initiative."
     

    parliamentary zooming

    Member
    Canadian English
    This is a government context and by "initiative" the writer does mean "program." I think that if a program gets to be a certain age, it should no longer be called an initiative, which is why I don't like "new initiative."
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    I don't really like it either, and if you want to change it, you have my full support, if you want it. :) It's certainly fair to say that the "new" isn't necessary, particularly if the context makes it clear that it is in fact new.

    But what we can't say is that "new initiative" is wrong, because it really isn't. It's merely unnecessary. I think it's important for editors (I am one too) to differentiate between something that is "wrong," something that is "redundant" and something that we simply "don't like."
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    I don't know, Parliamentary Zoning - I think the concept of "new" is fairly important to this sentence. If you just can't bear "new initiative," could you change it to "new program" or "new effort"?
     
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