A new piece of language

Kideyes

Senior Member
Spanish, Spain
Hi, everybody!

"Unless I put a new piece of language into practice immediately, I find I forget it" Does something to do with brush a skill up?
Thanks. :)
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Your question is not properly phrased (I think you mean “does this have” something to do with…?). And the answer is, anyway, no.

    To brush up [on] a subject means to improve or refresh/revitalise skills in it that you already possess.

    She’s going to France on holiday so she wants to brush up on her French.
    Before starting my new job I need to brush up my computer skills.
     

    Kideyes

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain
    Your question is not properly phrased (I think you mean “does this have” something to do with…?). And the answer is, anyway, no.

    To brush up [on] a subject means to improve or refresh/revitalise skills in it that you already possess.

    She’s going to France on holiday so she wants to brush up on her French.
    Before starting my new job I need to brush up my computer skills.
    Thanks a million for correcting me. The more you correct me the more I learn. So all your feedback is really welcome.:)
    <Once I have read again the way I express my doubt, I have seen I didn't explain myself properly. Sorry.
    I knew what "brush up" meant, I mentioned it just to have a go to approach to the meaning of the sentence. So, I keep on without understanding what "a new piece of language" means in that context. :confused:
     

    Kideyes

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain
    If you didn't write it yourself, please tell us where you saw this sentence.
    I found it in a unit focused on learning languages. And It's a single sentence in an exercise. That's all the info I get. Hope be enough.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Unless I put a new piece of language into practice immediately, I find I forget it
    = When I learn a new word or phrase, or some other aspect of the language, I find I quickly forget it if I don’t make use of it straight away
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I don't think "a new piece of language" is particularly idiomatic ->
    Unless I put new vocabulary into practice immediately, I find I forget it
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Without asking him or her, there's no way of knowing exactly what the writer meant as 'a new piece of language' is not idiomatic, but I agree with lingobingo's suggestion in post #6: " . . . a new word or phrase, or some other aspect of the language, . . . ".
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    You haven't really given us the source of the sentence. I agree with PaulQ that the writing isn't precise. "A piece of language":eek:. How can you put "a piece of language" "into practice"? The general idea is obvious, but badly expressed.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    To me, "vocabulary" = anything that is said, and that can be legitimately extended to include points of grammar. Lingobingo's descriptive phrase is more accurate, but much longer.

    If you insist on emphasising that what you have learned is "a point of grammar", say "point of grammar" - otherwise use "vocabulary".
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    To me, "vocabulary" = anything that is said
    Sorry, to me "vocabulary" only means individual words, as you might look them up in a dictionary or thesaurus. Phrases and grammar are not vocabulary.
    I suggest the closest likely candidate for what the OP's book might mean by "piece of language" is "expression".
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Not worth arguing about, but vocabulary does refer specifically to individual words or terms: The body of words used in a particular language / The body of words known to an individual person.


    slowly cross-posted and agreeing
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    The sentence is an example given in a word list accompanying the Cambridge Empower series of English language textbooks: it illustrates the use of the expression put something into practice.

    I'm with those respondents who have no difficulty with it.
     

    Kideyes

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain
    The sentence is an example given in a word list accompanying the Cambridge Empower series of English language textbooks: it illustrates the use of the expression put something into practice.

    I'm with those respondents who have no difficulty with it.
    Hi, all!
    That's it, Loob! You hit the nail on the head with the source. How did you find it? The unit deals with learning languages.
    So, thanks a lot to everyone!
    After the first replies, I could find the meaning out by the context. However, I had doubts about when and how I could use it.
    Now I see I can use it with anything linked with languages.
    Thanks a million again!
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I would put a theoretical piece of information into practice. When I learn how to use a new tense, I put the rules I've learned into practice.

    When I've learned some new vocabulary, I need to practice using it in sentences so as not to forget it.

    (I follow the AE practice of using the spelling "practice" for both verb and noun, otherwise I get confused:oops:.)
     
    Last edited:

    Kideyes

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain
    I would put a theoretical piece of information into practice. When I learn how to use a new tense, I put the rules I've learned into practice.

    When I've learned some new vocabulary, I need to practice using it in sentences so as not to forget it.
    :thumbsup: Thank you!
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top