a newly-graduated student

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windyvalley

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi,

Can you please help review these two sentences and let me know if there is any mistake? Do they make sense to you?

1)We want to find a newly-graduated student for this job vacancy.

2)The people we want to find for the job vacancy is a newly-graduated student.

Thanks in advance!

Windy:)
 
  • Mr.X Senior

    Senior Member
    Burmese & English (2nd Language)
    1. We want frash graduated for the vacancy.
    2. The people whom we want are fresh graduate.

    Since the student had graduated, it's no longer graduated student -- in my point of view.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    1. We want frash graduated for the vacancy.
    2. The people whom we want are fresh graduate.

    Since the student had graduated, it's no longer graduated student -- in my point of view.
    I'm not sure whether they are typos or not, Mr. X Senior, but your sentences are incorrect, I'm afraid.

    WV, please ask specific questions about your concerns, if any. Your first sentence is fine. Your second sentence is not.
     

    El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    1)We want to find a newly-graduated student for this job vacancy.

    2)The people we want to find for the job vacancy is a newly-graduated student.
    Whilst I agree with what Mr X Senior says about a graduate not being a student, technically, I think it's splitting hairs and I don't think sentence 1 needs to change.

    In sentence 2 there is a lack of agreement between "the people" and "is (a newly-graduated student)", so to rescue the sentence either change "people" to "person", which is singular, or finish the sentence "are newly-graduated students".
     

    El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    1. We want frash graduated for the vacancy.
    2. The people whom we want are fresh graduate.
    With all due respect to you, Mr X Senior, I'm afraid your efforts are not correct on this occasion and, to avoid any potential confusion for future readers of this thread, I agree with what dimcl said in his post. "Fresh graduated" (I'm assuming there was a typo in the first word - and if the second word is also a typo, please forgive this explanation) cannot serve as a noun in this context - fresh graduates would just about work, although recent would be a better word than fresh. In the second sentence, "graduate" needs to be plural, to agree with "are", and again I would use recent rather than fresh. (In the second sentence, "whom" is not necessary, and the sentence would sound better without it.)
     

    simnamedmark

    New Member
    English - American
    Hi,

    Can you please help review these two sentences and let me know if there is any mistake? Do they make sense to you?

    1)We want to find a newly-graduated student for this job vacancy.

    2)The people we want to find for the job vacancy is a newly-graduated student.

    Thanks in advance!

    Windy:)
    1) We want to find a newly-graduated student for this job opening.
    2)This person we want to find for the job opening is a newly-graduated student.

    'vacancy' works, but it sounds a little off. 'job opening' sounds better to me. You can say 'newly-graduated' because it shows you want someone who just recently graduated.
     

    El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    'vacancy' works, but it sounds a little off.
    Hi simnamedmark.

    Can you explain "off" please? I think vacancy is the perfect word. Maybe it's a difference between BE and AE - BE uses both words but neither is better than the other.
     

    windyvalley

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Hi Dimcl ,El escoces ,simnamedmark

    Thanks for your kindly help!

    So I should change my writing like this:

    1)We want to find a newly-graduated person for this job vacancy.

    2)The person we want to find for the job vacancy is a newly-graduated one.

    Do they OK?

    Thanks!

    Windy :):)
     

    El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    One last point, windyvalley.

    In your second original sentence, the use of the word "is", it now occurs to me, is suspect. "The person we want to find for the job vacancy is a newly-graduated student" - at this point in time, "the person" is unidentified, and for that reason I think it would be better to say "The person we want to find will be a newly-graduated student" (leaving aside the other point about "newly-graduated student" being an oxymoron).
     

    El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    1)We want to find a newly-graduated person for this job vacancy.

    2)The person we want to find for the job vacancy is a newly-graduated one.
    Better! Subject to my comment in post #10, you have just about cracked it.

    Of course you can avoid that point by restructuring slightly - "We are looking for a newly-graduated person to fill this vacancy".
     

    windyvalley

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Hi El escoces,

    Thank you very much for your detailed explanations!
    They help me understand English better than before!

    Windy :):)
     

    simnamedmark

    New Member
    English - American
    When I said it sounded a little 'off', I meant it sounded a little weird to me. I personally hear 'job opening' much more frequently. But that may just be my personal experiences. It's ok if you use 'vacancy' :)
     
    Last edited:

    nzfauna

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    Also, in my experience, compound adjectives in which the first word ends in -ly don't need a hyphen.

    E.g.
    "Newly graduated student"
    vs
    A rash-inducing allergen.

    Does anyone else have this understanding?
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Windy Valley, a common term used in such situation is "a recent graduate", or perhaps "a recent college graduate" or "a recent university graduate". You may also say "someone who has recently graduated from college (AE)/university (BE)"
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I agree with GWB's comments on the stylistic choices.

    I also agree with nzfauna's comment about the about the use of hypens in compound modifiers.

    Also, in my experience, compound adjectives in which the first word ends in -ly don't need a hyphen.

    E.g.
    "Newly graduated student"
    vs
    A rash-inducing allergen.

    Does anyone else have this understanding?
    Because words ending in -ly are easily recognized as adverbs, and therefore as modifying the following adjective rather than the noun, they do not require a hyphen. At least, this is the view of many punctuation guides. (See compound modifiers in this Wiki article on the Hyphen.)
     

    Tunca

    New Member
    Turkish
    Windy Valley, a common term used in such situation is "a recent graduate", or perhaps "a recent college graduate" or "a recent university graduate". You may also say "someone who has recently graduated from college (AE)/university (BE)"


    Since I am one of those mentioned in the post, I agree with GreenWhiteBlue :) I think "recently graduated" is the best. Also since it is going to be a job post, you may include "entry level position" phrase.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    IBecause words ending in -ly are easily recognized as adverbs, and therefore as modifying the following adjective rather than the noun, they do not require a hyphen. At least, this is the view of many punctuation guides. (See compound modifiers in this Wiki article on the Hyphen.)
    It should be noted that most words that end in -ly are adverbs. There are, however, many common words that end in -ly and that are adjectives, not adverbs (examples include ugly, silly, and jolly.) Other words that end in -ly can be either adjectives or adverbs depending on how they are used (for example, early or daily.) You therefore should not assume that just because a word ends in -ly it must be an adverb.
     
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