A nice or subtle way to say "He died" and follow-up.

Cosmas1

Senior Member
Hi, all.

Having lost a parent figure recently I am looking for the "nicest" or most subtle way of saying "he died".

The word "πἐθανε" seems a little raw or blunt. The word "τον χἀσαμε" is close to what I want, but I am wondering if there are any other options.

The context I want to use it in is if someone calls looking for my dad, and I want to say "he died" or "he passed away" .

Thank you.
 
  • GreekNative

    Senior Member
    Greek - Greece
    Hi Cosmas,

    as you righfully said, you can say "Δυστυχώς τον χάσαμε", by adding when (i.e. "πριν από λίγο καιρό"). By saying δυστυχώς and adding a time reference you prolong the phrase and make it sound a bit more subtle. There's other things you can say, but I think this is the best way.
     

    Cosmas1

    Senior Member
    That sounds good. So I could just leave a pause after they ask for him and then say δυστυχὠς τον χἀσαμε περσει το καλοκἀιρη.

    if so, how would you say "Is there something I can help you with?" or "Is there something I can do for you?"
     

    GreekNative

    Senior Member
    Greek - Greece
    If this is supposed to come after the explanation that your father passed away, then you could say "Μπορώ να κάνω κάτι για σας"; Or "τι ακριβώς θα θέλατε;", which is a tiny bit more direct, but more to the point. So you could say that in a polite tone, so the other party is not surprised/offended.
     

    Cosmas1

    Senior Member
    I'm sitting in his apartment and the phone rings. (This is his phone that he used to answer when he was alive.) Someone calls that does not know he's dead and asks for him. I tell them "δυστυχὠς τον χἀσαμε..." After that I would like to ask the caller "Is there something I can help you with. This is his son."
     

    Cosmas1

    Senior Member
    Our posts crossed paths. Could you say μπορω να σας βοηθεισω; Ειμαι ο γιος του.

    Or would there be something better to say? Thanks.
     

    GreekNative

    Senior Member
    Greek - Greece
    So you can add "Ο γιος του είμαι. Τι ακριβώς θα θέλατε;" or "Είμαι ο γιος του. Μπορώ να κάνω κάτι για σας;" or "Εγώ είμαι ο γιος του. Περί τίνος πρόκειται;". Περί τίνος πρόκειται literally means "what is it about" but it sounds softer in Greek than it does in English.
     

    GreekNative

    Senior Member
    Greek - Greece
    Μπορώ να σας βοηθήσω is fine, too. So, overall, I would say "Εμμμ... Δυστυχώς τον χάσαμε (πριν από...). Εγώ είμαι ο γιος του. Μπορώ να σας βοηθήσω σε κάτι";
     

    Cosmas1

    Senior Member
    If I want to send out an announcement to his vendors, announcing his death would I say "Δυστιχως θελουμε να σας πουμε οτι ο Κ. Αγγελος Δημητριου αποβιοσε συντομα" -- and he won't be doing business any more.

    How does one say that without sounding wooden?

    Thank you.
     

    Δημήτρης

    Senior Member
    Cypriot Greek
    αποβιοσε συντομα
    πρόσφατα is the right word here.

    How about: Δυστυχώς ο κ. Άγγελος Δημητρίου απεβίωσε πρόσφατα και για αυτό τον λόγο η συνεργασία (σας) δεν μπορεί να συνεχιστεί.

    Although in that case I would try to be even more formal.
     

    GreekNative

    Senior Member
    Greek - Greece
    Well, if you send out an announcement to his vendors, meaning that they're not in the family's close circle, wouldn't it have to sound a bit more official, thus "wooden"? I'm asking, so I can think of a way that would suit you best.

    I would write "Η οικογένεια του _____ θα θέλαμε να σας ενημερώσουμε ότι ο πατέρας και σύζυγός μας (if this is the case, meaning if your mother is still alive) απεβίωσε πρόσφατα. Θα θέλαμε να σας ευχαριστήσουμε για την μακρόχρονη συνεργασία και σας ευχόμαστε υγεία και μακροημέρευση. Με τιμή, (+ your name)".

    The part of the phrase "θα θέλαμε..." is a bit rigid and official so you can't say it over the phone, but it serves the purpose, and I think it's a complete and polite way to convey the message, if this is a written announcement.
     

    Cosmas1

    Senior Member
    Hey guys, on this note, how do you say "we lost him unexpectedly" instead of "we lost him recently" meaning it was out of the blue and there was no warning...

    απροσδὀκητα;

    Thanks.
     

    GreekNative

    Senior Member
    Greek - Greece
    Another natural way to say it, more casually, as to a friend or another member of the family, is "τον χάσαμε ξαφνικά". "Απρόσμενα", as Δημήτρης suggested, is probably better, though, as it is more accurate and sounds softer.
     

    GreekNative

    Senior Member
    Greek - Greece
    Since "απρόσμενος" (adjective) and "απρόσμενα" (adverb) mean unexpected(ly), there's a quite wide range of uses.

    I.e.

    Η επιχείρησή μας φέτος είχε απρόσμενα κέρδη = Our business made unexpected profit, this year.

    Απρόσμενη αύξηση της τουριστικής κίνησης = Unexpected rise in tourist arrivals

    Πιθανή αύξηση του πληθωρισμού μπορεί να έχει απρόσμενες συνέπειες = An eventual growth of inflation could have unexpected consequences.

    Η έρευνα πήρε απρόσμενη τροπή = The investigation took an unexpected turn.

    Ο τρίτος μας γιος ήρθε απρόσμενα = Our third son came unexpectedly (meaning, we weren't planning to have a third child/son).

    So, as in English, it can refer to something positive, negative or neutral.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top