a Nissan's and a Honda's

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Gabriel Malheiros, Mar 22, 2016.

  1. Gabriel Malheiros Senior Member

    Portuguese - Brazil
    Hello, everyone

    I would like to know if I can use words with 's as adjectives and after "a/an/the" Like:

    I've ever had only two cars: a Nissan's (one) and a Honda's (one)


    In the two nouns, I am omitting the word car : a Nissan's car and a Honda's car.

    Is my sentence wrong? Can'I say "a Nissan's and a Honda's?

    Or maybe without the 's. Just "a Nissan and a Honda"

    Thank you
     
  2. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
     
  3. Gabriel Malheiros Senior Member

    Portuguese - Brazil
    So could I say: " I buy a Nissan"??
     
  4. Myridon

    Myridon Senior Member

    Texas
    English - US
    You could say "I bought a Nissan." or "I buy Nissans." (You don't buy the same car as a habit.)
     
  5. Gabriel Malheiros Senior Member

    Portuguese - Brazil
    What if I am talking about the dealerships that sell cars of these brands. Could I say something like

    There are two car dealerships near my street. A Nissan and a Honda... or A Nissan's and a Honda's?
     
  6. Myridon

    Myridon Senior Member

    Texas
    English - US
    ... a Nissan dealership and a Honda dealership.
    Nissan is the type of car/dealership, not the owner. John Smith Nissan is a dealership that belongs to John Smith (the dealer) that sells Nissan cars. It's John Smith's Nissan dealership.
     
  7. Gabriel Malheiros Senior Member

    Portuguese - Brazil
    But and without 's? Could I say "there are two car dealerships near my street, one of which is a Nissan"... Could I say that? one of which is a Nissan?
     
  8. Hermione Golightly

    Hermione Golightly Senior Member

    London
    British English
    Think of Nissan as an adjective. You can say " ...one of which is a Nissan (dealership) ...", but it;s unnecessary.
    'There are two dealerships near me: a Nissan and a Ford.'
     
  9. Gabriel Malheiros Senior Member

    Portuguese - Brazil

    Can I always use those nouns as adjectives? Like : I bought an Apple (a mobile phone)? I bought a Hugo Boss (perfume) ? But, what if I want to use the words "mobile phone" or "Perfume", how could I say that? By using the preposition "of"? "I bought a mobile phone of Apple" "I bought a perfume of Hugo Boss'"? Is that wrong?

    Thank you so much!
     
  10. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    I bought an Apple mobile phone.
    I bough a Hugo Boss perfume.
     
  11. Glenfarclas Senior Member

    Chicago
    English (American)
    You can say "I bought a Hugo Boss perfume," but not just "I bought a Hugo Boss."

    Those are both wrong, yes.
     
  12. Cagey post mod (English Only / Latin)

    California
    English - US
    If Hugo Boss makes several types of perfume and you bought one of them, you could say "I bought a Hugo Boss perfume."
    You wouldn't (usually) say, "I bought a Hugo Boss." People refer to a individual car by its brand name; they don't do the same with perfumes.

    If Hugo Boss is a type of perfume, you would say "I bought Hugo Boss perfume."
    In a general conversation about perfumes, where everyone knows that is what you are talking about, you might say, "I buy Hugo Boss."
     
  13. Moolric

    Moolric Senior Member

    Brisbane
    English - Australia
    You can't really say "I bought an Apple" because Apple makes a lot of different things (unless you already established what type of device like Cagey said). You could say "I bought an Android" because Androids are usually phones.

    Pretty much any time it would be redundant, or you'd be repeating yourself, you can leave off the noun. In fact it will sound better. :)
     
  14. sound shift

    sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    We can't say "a Nissan's car" or "a Honda's car". This is an incorrect use of the possessive with apostrophe "s", as the meaning is "a car belonging to a Nissan" and "a car belonging to a Honda", both of which are nonsensical.
     
  15. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    In these cases, you cannot use the possessive, you must use the noun/name as an adjective.
     

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