a non sequitur?

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Alex Coseff

Senior Member
Czech
Hello,

in the following paragraph, the two sentences seem somewhat non-sequitur... I understand it must be very hard to either to confirm of refute my assumption without a larger context. Though, I´d be really grateful for your comment.

Background info:
A teenage boy (called Luke) is being interviewed at the police station.
In the sentence which I put as first Luke is being directly accused of murdering his girlfriend; immediately after that, an objection is raised by Luke´s duty solicitor - this sentence is followed by a sentence which seems totally out of context (ie. Luke had refused the presence of his father...) . At least I think so. Or am I missing something?
Many thanks.

Victoria Jenkins: The girls in the water

Luke: I didn´t want to leave her on her own. Her mother was away and...
Sergeant: And that gave you an opportunity to go back and kill her.

There was an objection from the duty solicitor. Luke had refused the presence of his father, and Chloe didn´t blame him. He´d been better there alone than with either of their parents.
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Presumably (reading this, but not knowing the law, or his relationship with his parents other than what is said here), a teenager would normally have a parent present at police interview, because they were under-age (under 18). But perhaps over some age (such as 16) they have a right to choose about this, and Luke has chosen to have only the duty solicitor.
     

    Alex Coseff

    Senior Member
    Czech
    Thank you, Entanglebank. Yes, I see. What strikes me, though, is that is sentence appears when the interview is almost over... this is what really puzzles me...
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Has the duty solicitor spoken or been prominent earlier? Perhaps this was the first convenient opportunity to bring the father's absence in.

    My only experience of duty solicitors is on television shows, admittedly, where they're non-speaking parts to save money. Really they just want to show the police officer interrogating the suspect, but for authenticity they have a solicitor (who usually says nothing even at the most outrageous accusations).
     
    Last edited:

    Alex Coseff

    Senior Member
    Czech
    No, the duty solicitor hasn´t been mentioned before.
    Anyway, thanks a lot! It´s probably as you as - that perhaps that was the first convenient opportunity to mention the father´s absence.
    Thank you:)
     
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