a number of potential nannies <come through>

Discussion in 'English Only' started by VicNicSor, Oct 13, 2017.

  1. VicNicSor

    VicNicSor Senior Member

    Russia
    Russian
    Greta is hired as a nanny for a boy in a house. The owner tells her:
    — Hmm. Well, we've had a number of potential nannies come through already. Brahms [the boy] has rejected them all,though they weren't nearly as young or as pretty as you.
    The Boy, movie

    Is it this meaning of come through?:
    I.s., Brahms rejected them before they could get to their job?
    Thank you.
     
  2. Myridon

    Myridon Senior Member

    Texas
    English - US
    They came here. They were interviewed. They left. They came through here.
     
  3. lingobingo

    lingobingo Senior Member

    London
    English - England
    The family would probably have used a specialist employment agency for domestic staff. So candidates for the job came through the agency (were sent by the agency to be interviewed).
     
  4. VicNicSor

    VicNicSor Senior Member

    Russia
    Russian
    Sorry, it seems like lingobingo agrees with the definition in #1, while Myridon doesn't.
    What meaning of the phrasal verb is it, could you explain it please.
     
  5. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    I agree with Myridon. They have met Brahms, probably at his home, and he has rejected them.

    It is ambiguous, though. It could mean they have volunteered to fulfill a need.
     
  6. lingobingo

    lingobingo Senior Member

    London
    English - England
    It's a bit ambiguous, I agree. But if you want to pin it down to a definition, then the one in the OP is probably as close as it gets. In other words, they've had several candidates "come through" the system rather than through the house.
     
  7. VicNicSor

    VicNicSor Senior Member

    Russia
    Russian
    Thank you everbody!
    Sorry what do you mean?
     
  8. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    In the WR dictionary under come:

     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2017
  9. Myridon

    Myridon Senior Member

    Texas
    English - US
    Sometimes a verb and another word form a phrasal verb which needs to be defined in the dictionary. Sometimes a verb and another word are a verb and another word so there is no dictionary definition.
     
  10. MarcB Senior Member

    US English
    I think all of the options offered are possible. My first thought would agree with Myridon.
     
  11. VicNicSor

    VicNicSor Senior Member

    Russia
    Russian
    Forero, I still don't understand:) Do you mean they worked without being paid?...
    But in this context, "through" (which probably means "through some stages until the accepting") used with "come" sounds strange then, doesn't it? I mean, I'd expect it with "go" or "get"...

    x-posted with Mark
     
  12. MarcB Senior Member

    US English
    They came looking for the job, the child rejected them. Other possibilities exist but this is the most logical for AE.
     
  13. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    No, only that they accepted the challenge because they understood the need.

    I only mention this as a possible meaning for "come through", not the one that best fits the context.

    I am not familiar with nannies, so I may be overly influenced by Mary Poppins, but I still imagine the nannies coming through a process that includes meeting the prospective clients and learning something about their routine.
     
  14. VicNicSor

    VicNicSor Senior Member

    Russia
    Russian
    Yes, this is clear frpm the context, the problem is the reason for using "come through" here:)
    It says "fulfill needs or meet demands". I just don't understand -- if the boy rejected them all, how did they meet demands or fulfill the needs? Or would it mean that the boy's approval was not included in there...
     
  15. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    The need for a nanny created a need for applicants. People met the need for applicants before they were rejected for the job itself.

    They "came through", in this sense, because they showed up to be interviewed, willing to do the job if accepted.
     
  16. VicNicSor

    VicNicSor Senior Member

    Russia
    Russian
    And could you tell me please how this option differs from Myridon's one with which you seem to agree?
     
  17. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    The two meanings are concerned with different times. First they showed up and applied for the job. After that they went through the interview process.

    It was after all of that, or toward the end of the process, that they were rejected.
     
  18. VicNicSor

    VicNicSor Senior Member

    Russia
    Russian
    Thank you for the replies.

    Do I correctly understand the meaning of come and through could be parsed as this:

    They all come here to this place, and they go through the process of testing them to see if they are suitable for the job.
     
  19. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    I think this is the most likely meaning.

    LingoBingo's suggestion looks at it as coming here after going through a process.

    My alternative suggestion is harder to explain without just saying "come through" has a meaning not inherent in its parts. The idea might be that when opportunity comes knocking, people tend to hide, but a few brave souls may "come through" their trepidation and answer the door. Or they might be like the sun, having hidden behind the clouds for a long time, "coming through" the clouds to bring us light.
     
  20. VicNicSor

    VicNicSor Senior Member

    Russia
    Russian
    Thank you !
     

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