a ... of deer

  • katie_here

    Senior Member
    England/English
    These kind of animals naturally form in groups which are called "herds". A herd of animals is distinguished by their movements, in that, the whole group move together and are following each other's behaviour. If one is scared and runs off, the others will follow suit until all the herd is running together.

    The verb "to herd" comes from a farmer or herder, simulating the first animal in the group to move thus encouraging all the other animals to emulate this behaviour.

    A herder is called this because he is controlling the herd's movements.
     

    gasman

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    For deer, herd , leash, and mob can used, but for roe deer, apparently, they gather in a bevy. Personally, "bunch" is as useful as anything else.
     

    katie_here

    Senior Member
    England/English
    I've never heard bunch used to describe deer, maybe bananas and grapes, but not animals.

    Mob, leash and bevy? Where are these terms used?
     
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    El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    I love it! Wikipedia makes no mention of mob or leash, but it does confirm bevy (specifically for roes) and also cites department and potpourri (!), as well as herd, as collective nouns for deer.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    In Connecticut (New England, U.S.), where they have no natural enemies but the automobile, multiply like bunnies, and eat flowers and shrubs right up to one's house, they are called a pestilence of deer. That is not a scientific name.
     

    Bonasa

    New Member
    English-US
    Among game biologists and deer hunters in the U.S., "the deer herd" refers to the aggregate population in a certain area. Whitetails in the north (Maine I am familiar with) migrate to "yards," thick evergreen forests where the snow may not be so deep, there is protection from the wind and some amount of browse. In spring the survivors disperse back to their various homes ranges.
    Whitetails in the south form a social structure among those which share the same habitat. The bucks establish a pecking order, with the dominant bucks getting breeding rights to as many does as they may covet to the extent that they successfully chase off other bucks. Small groups of bucks often travel together in the summer, and often a doe with a single fawn will travel with a doe with twins. Whitetails, however, do not form a larger group, a "herd," as do bison, for example.
     

    El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    In Connecticut (New England, U.S.), where they have no natural enemies but the automobile, multiply like bunnies, and eat flowers and shrubs right up to one's house, they are called a pestilence of deer.
    I thought automobiles were the latter-day plague.

    Isn't it amazing that the English language can provide so many collective nouns for a single animal, and ranging from the downright mundane (but somehow amusingly unimaginative) "bunch" to the exotic "potpourri" and "rangale". And all this while most of us, prior to this thread, thought "herd" was our only option.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    I escaped some four hundred miles to the north after they ganged up on my strawberry patch. They slept on it. Crushed berries and Lyme disease bearing ticks were not appetizing. The whitetails do forms herds in Fairfield County, CT. Bonasa's statements may be true in wilder environments, but herds of five or more whitetails, all females, are often seen in gardens, on residential streets, and everywhere else you wouldn't want them. Such groups are not often seen this far north.
     

    El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    I escaped some four hundred miles to the north after they ganged up on my strawberry patch. They slept on it. Crushed berries and Lyme disease bearing ticks were not appetizing. The whitetails do forms herds in Fairfield County, CT. Bonasa's statements may be true in wilder environments, but herds of five or more whitetails, all females, are often seen in gardens, on residential streets, and everywhere else you wouldn't want them. Such groups are not often seen this far north.
    In Glasgow, Scotland there are bevies, herds of five or more if you will (all female) roaming everywhere you wouldn't want them, but in this case they are of the species homo sapiens. They tend to congregate at, and drink heartily in, local watering-holes, after which I wouldn't be surprised if some of them sleep on someone else's strawberry patch. No ticks, but some people think they're a menace just the same.

    It's enough to drive you banana's, Katie, or bonker's (or nut's).
     

    Bonasa

    New Member
    English-US
    Indeed, many do appear at attractive feeding spots. I have videos of as many as thirty deer in a given field. What I am saying is that in the U.S. south whitetails don't form stable "herds," (in the sense of the question) but rather go their own way in much smaller groups when they move about their natural habitat.
     

    El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Indeed we could. Many a person has been heard, on seeing a herder hunt for his lost deer, saying: "Hmm, Johnny, I see you've misplaced your apostrophe again".
     

    katie_here

    Senior Member
    England/English
    In Glasgow, Scotland there are bevies, herds of five or more if you will (all female) roaming everywhere you wouldn't want them, but in this case they are of the species homo sapiens. They tend to congregate at, and drink heartily in, local watering-holes, after which I wouldn't be surprised if some of them sleep on someone else's strawberry patch. No ticks, but some people think they're a menace just the same.

    It's enough to drive you banana's, Katie, or bonker's (or nut's).
    Hey! ;)
     
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