A ok

PulauPandan

Senior Member
Indonesian
Hi,
When can I use 'a ok' in a sentence? Can I use it for people or things?
My examples:
"Are you a ok?" or
"Is this car a ok?"
I think I'll use it for things.
Thank you, so much.
 
  • boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Both of your examples are ungrammatical, Pulau. Don't use "a ok" like this. In fact, the very "word" "OK" is best avoided although we all use it :)
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    A-OK, as it is perhaps more usually written, is a colloquial expression.
    There are conflicting views on its origins :)
    1961 Flight LXXIX. 615/1 The astronaut probably added a new phrase to the English language by his repeated use of ‘A-OK’ to report satisfactory conditions in flight. On the way back to Cocoa Beach Florida, six miles south of the Cape, newsmen were shouting ‘A-OK’ to one another, and many used the phrase in their stories. It means ‘all OK’.
    1970 N. ARMSTRONG et al. First on Moon i. 18 ‘A-OK’, an expression coined by a public affairs announcer, and one which the astronauts..never did use.

    It doesn't feature in my active vocabulary so I have no real idea how or when it is normally used.

    (Quotations taken from the OED.)
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    :eek:
    I thought the "a" was used as an indefinite article and read it as such.

    Then if the combination is used in writing it should at least be hyphenated or capitalised to avoid confusion.

    Given the circumstances, I am not going to pretend I've ever heard this :)
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I thought the "a" was used as an indefinite article and read it as such.

    Then if the combination is used in writing it should at least be hyphenated or capitalised to avoid confusion.

    Given the circumstances, I am not going to pretend I've ever heard this :)
    It's no longer commonly used (at least here in the US) and is mostly of historical/military interest. When used, it was always written "A-OK."

    "OK" itself is short for "okay," which is very commonly used in US English, in conversation and in casual, informal writing and may mean--depending on context--yes, all right, good. It would not be used in formal writing such as an article, except to quote someone.

    By the way: The expression is, "I'm going to pretend I never heard this".
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    But that's not what I wanted to say :) I wanted to say that it's useless to pretend I have ever heard this "A-OK", i.e. I really have never heard it.
    Oops! :eek:

    Sorry I misinterpreted--but I see that someone else had the same reaction I did, so I don't feel so bad. :D
     

    miss.meri91

    Senior Member
    English - South Africa
    I've heard the expression 'A-ok" quite a few times, usually as a rhetorical question.

    For example,
    A bunch of guests are at a dinner party, and the host is busy in the kitchen or something. he comes out briefly to check that everything's okay with his guests, and he says, "Is everything A-OK?"

    OR

    Simply, in response to the question, "How are you?"
    "I'm A-OK."
    Note: Often after having done something embarrassing in public, such as fall flat on your face in front of everyone in the queue at the supermarket. (yes, this may have happened to me once.)
     
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