a pair of hole-ridden slacks

Kamaichan2309

New Member
Vietnam - Vietnamese
I can't understand what "a pair of hole-ridden slacks" is! Can anyone help me to describe it?? Thank you so much.

Background: A few days later, John was flopping around his apartment in a pair of hole-ridden slacks, fingering the rips and wondering if he should go shopping.
 
  • lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    His slacks (pants) are ridden with (filled with) holes.

    It's just a participle modifying "slacks," but since it has another word attached to it in the longer form ("the slacks were ridden with holes") that word gets carried along and joined to the participle with a dash. The same thing happens with "so-called," "world-renowned," "error-laden," etc.

    Hope that helps and hello!
     

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    I can't understand what "a pair of hole-ridden slacks" is! Can anyone help me to describe it?? Thank you so much.

    Background: A few days later, John was flopping around his apartment in a pair of hole-ridden slacks, fingering the rips and wondering if he should go shopping.
    The WR definition of slacks that is pertenant to your question is "2 (slacks) casual trousers". This can be found in the WR English dictionary.

    GF..

    That should be enough to answer your question. You could have looked the meaning of slacks up...
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    Yeah, but it can be confusing when suddenly verbs are getting words stuck onto them.
     

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Yeah, but it can be confusing when suddenly verbs are getting words stuck onto them.
    That begs the riposte... That's quite a normal thing to do.

    I assumed that hole-ridden was relatively self evident and often used... Or perhaps, why should I be so dumb?
    The moths have been my at shirt, it is hole-ridden.

    Or is it actually hole-riddled? Or is it both of them?

    GF..

    To err comes naturally..... :D It is one of the signs of being alive.
     
    Last edited:

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    It seems to me that the meaning of 'hole-ridden' would not be obvious to a non-native. If you look it up in our dictionary, you will not find an entry. There is a definition under ride that fits, but I wouldn't expect people asking this question to know how to find it.

    Of course, we don't know exactly which part of the phrase was confusing to Kamaichan2309.

    Welcome, Kamaichan2309. :)

    Which part of the phrase confused you? In all our back and forth conversation, have we answered your question?

    Also, we ask you name the source of every quotation. ;)
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    The link is an imaginative explanation but I have great difficulty with it.

    I think it should not be debt/hole-ridden but debt/hole-riven

    I suspect that "ridden" is a common corruption of
    rive (v) pp. riv·en

    v.tr.1. To rend or tear apart.

    2. To break into pieces, as by a blow; cleave or split asunder.
    3. To break or distress (the spirit, for example).

    v.intr. To be or become split.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    From our dictionary's definition of ride:


    5 (often in combination be ridden) be full of or dominated by: crime-ridden streets.​


    Be that as it may, we still need Kamaichan2309 to tell us whether any of this is to the point.
     

    Kamaichan2309

    New Member
    Vietnam - Vietnamese
    I'm sorry because I didn't include the source in my post!
    Exactly 'hole-ridden' part of the phrase was confusing to me. In all your back and all conversation, I had my answer.
    Thank you to the members who answered and explained my question. I can translate that phrase into my first language but I just can't understand how it is described. Maybe I need a image of it.
    This is my first post, so Cagey, would you forgive me? I will observe the forum rules fully in the next time.
     

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Does "flop around" mean "walk aimlessly or awkwardly about a place"?
    Yes/no. You flop down on your bed when you are tired. Also when you are tired you could flop around in the kitchen trying to make a cup of coffee. Or you get up from a hard chair and flop down into the armchair. I wouldn't associate this directly with aimless or awkward behaviour. Nevertheless that could be the case/reason...

    I also flop arround when I am bored. It is often quite aimless but I would not go so far as to say awkwardly. Flopping arround can be aimless or not. I can flop from chair to settee without it being aimless or awkward. But somedays it is aimless and awkward.

    So flop around does not imply aimless or awkward, but it often is aimless and awkward. I generally flop arround when I am tired. I certainly flopped down in my chair in front of my PC a few minutes ago. But that was because I am tired.

    GF..

    Sleep well...
     
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