a partial oblique

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VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
At a crime scene:
-- Mulder here found a print on the TV -- a partial oblique -- and it's not the victim's.
(and we see some man taking a print from the tv screen)
The X-Files, TV series

Is the 'oblique' here a noun meaning "something that is oblique"? Thank you.
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    A 'partial' here means just a bit of a fingerprint. I suspect 'oblique' is a technical term in the fingerprint business, meaning something like 'at an angle'.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    A 'partial' here means just a bit of a fingerprint. I suspect 'oblique' is a technical term in the fingerprint business, meaning something like 'at an angle'.
    Do you mean "partial" here is a noun and the "a" goes with it? And the "oblique" is an adjective?
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I should have been clearer. A 'partial' on its own, would be a noun meaning a partial fingerprint. And I'm guessing an 'oblique' on its own would be a noun meaning an oblique fingerprint. Putting the two together, 'partial' becomes an adjective describing the 'oblique'.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    He is saying it is a partial oblique fingerprint. Both words in bold are adjectives. Both are technical terms, with precise meanings within the field of fingerprinting.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Yes, it has to be a noun here: if it was an adjective, the phrase would be "a partial oblique one".
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    We're disagreeing with doji, Vic - at least, I am;).

    ----------

    EDIT. I've just read Julian's post below - I now see where doji was coming from....
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    So it is a noun here, not an adjective.
    That's what I asked... Doji said it was an adjective.
    In his sentence it was an adjective because he used it to modify the noun fingerprint.:)
    When used on its own we could regard it as an adjective if we consider the word fingerprint to have been omitted through ellipsis. However, it can be used as a standalone noun too - these categorizations are not governed by any law and this type of duality is not uncommon.
     
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