A partir das 24 horas do dia 01/02/2011

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  • William Stein

    Senior Member
    American English
    Eu diria "starting at 0:00AM of February 1st", mas não garanto...
    Thanks Archimec, I think that must be right because elsewhere in the policy the say: VIGÊNCIA DO SEGURO : 01/02/2011 Ã 01/02/2012

    Does you know how to say A PARTIR DAS 24 HORAS DO DIA 01/02/2011 ATÉ ÀS 24 HORAS DO DIA 01/02/2012 in English?

    What about
    From zero hours Feb. 1, 2011 until zero hours Feb. 1, 2012?
    or
    From the start of Feb. 1, 2011 until the start of Feb. 1, 2012?
    or
    From Feb 1. 2011 until midnight on March 31, 2012?
     

    Archimec

    Senior Member
    Portugal, portuguese
    Novamente sem garantias:
    "from 0:00AM Feb.1st 2011 until 12:00PM Feb.1st 2012".( ou seja, 24 horas do dia 1 fev.2011, e 24 horas do dia 1 fev. 2012)
     
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    Audie

    Senior Member
    Brazil Portuguese
    Também sem garantias, só para lançar mais dúvida: eu sempre pensei que 24:00 (se é que existe isso) seria o fim daquele dia, já que viriam depois das 23:00 daquele mesmo dia. Ou seja, 24:00 de 1º de fevereiro seria igual a 00:00 de 2 de fevereiro.

    Mas, pelo que William mostrou do texto, deo estar errada mesmo.
     

    William Stein

    Senior Member
    American English
    Também sem garantias, só para lançar mais dúvida: eu sempre pensei que 24:00 (se é que existe isso) seria o fim daquele dia, já que viriam depois das 23:00 daquele mesmo dia. Ou seja, 24:00 de 1º de fevereiro seria igual a 00:00 de 2 de fevereiro.

    Mas, pelo que William mostrou do texto, deo estar errada mesmo.
    I thought the same thing as you but then I found VIGÊNCIA DO SEGURO : 01/02/2011 Ã 01/02/2012. It must start at 0:00 a.m. Feb. 1, 2011 but the question is whether it ends at 0:00 a.m. Feb. 1 2012. Maybe Archimec is right about the policy expiring at the end of the day on Feb. 1 2012 even though that gives an extra day, because in the US, for example, where courts always decide in favor of consumers, it would be easy for a consumer to go to court and say: you said it expires on Feb. 1, that means at midnight (at the end of the day) on Feb. 1st!
     

    William Stein

    Senior Member
    American English
    I would say that it means 365 24-hour days. (1 day starts at 0:00AM and ends at 12:00PM)
    I don't know, my mind is definitely fuzzy at this point, but I think 0:00 a.m. to 0:00 a.m. would make the first 24-hour period, followed by 0:00 a.m. to 0:00 a.m. on the next day, etc., so all 24-hour periods that start at 0:00 a.m. would have to end at 0:00 a.m., too. That's why I think making the period end at 12:00 p.m. on that same day would add 24 hours (sorry to be such a pain in the [select the organ of your choice]!)

    Sorry, I wrote this before you added your note!
     

    William Stein

    Senior Member
    American English
    William, acho que v. tem razão. (No pain in the neck...)
    I think there might be a mistake in the text because 24h on Feb. 1 should definitely be at the end of Feb. 1, as Audierunt says. I think I'll just say
    "From 24:00 hrs on Feb. 1, 2011 to 24:00 hrs on Feb. 1, 2012" because I found some examples of that in English and this is driving me crazy.
     

    William Stein

    Senior Member
    American English
    Hi Everybody,

    I just wanted to say that I'm doing another translation for this same customer and it really does mean 366 days, as Archimec and Audierunt said:
    PRAZO DO SEGURO
    366 dias, de 12 de Marco de 2011 a 12 de Marco de 2012.
     

    Carfer

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Portugal
    Hi Everybody,

    I just wanted to say that I'm doing another translation for this same customer and it really does mean 366 days, as Archimec and Audierunt said:
    PRAZO DO SEGURO
    366 dias, de 12 de Marco de 2011 a 12 de Marco de 2012.
    Ok, de 12 de Março de 2011 a 12 de Março de 2012 são efectivamente 366 dias, porque 2012 é bissexto (Fevereiro tem 29 dias, em vez dos habituais 28), mas de 1 de Fevereiro de 2011 a 1 de Fevereiro de 2012 só são 365 (todos os meses incluídos nesse período têm a duração normal, só seriam 366 se o prazo acabasse depois de 29 de Fevereiro). Além disso, porque as 24:00 horas de um dia correspondam às 00:00 horas do dia seguinte, dizer que um prazo se inicia às 24:00 do dia 1 é, para mim, a mesma coisa que dizer que se inicia às 00:00 horas do dia 2. As 24:00 horas são, obviamente, o termo dum dia e, simultâneamente, o início doutro.
     

    William Stein

    Senior Member
    American English
    Ok, de 12 de Março de 2011 a 12 de Março de 2012 são efectivamente 366 dias, porque 2012 é bissexto (Fevereiro tem 29 dias, em vez dos habituais 28), mas de 1 de Fevereiro de 2011 a 1 de Fevereiro de 2012 só são 365 (todos os meses incluídos nesse período têm a duração normal, só seriam 366 se o prazo acabasse depois de 29 de Fevereiro). Além disso, porque as 24:00 horas de um dia correspondam às 00:00 horas do dia seguinte, dizer que um prazo se inicia às 24:00 do dia 1 é, para mim, a mesma coisa que dizer que se inicia às 00:00 horas do dia 2. As 24:00 horas são, obviamente, o termo dum dia e, simultâneamente, o início doutro.
    Hi Carfer,

    That's interesting, I didn't know 2012 was a leap year. I'm not sure they take that into account, though. It's true that 00:00 sounds like the beginning of the day rather than at the end of the day, so shouldn't it mean 366 todays, here, too (in reference to my original question for 2011-2012):
    A PARTIR DAS 24 HORAS DO DIA 01/02/2011 ATÉ ÀS 24 HORAS DO DIA 01/02/2012

    I mean if they wanted it to be 365 days they should have said:
    A PARTIR DAS 24 HORAS DO DIA 01/02/2011 ATÉ ÀS 00:00 HORAS DO DIA 01/02/2012

    Actually what I said just doesn't make much sense but intuitively it doesn't seem fair that they could exclude insurance coverage for an accident that occurs on Feb. 1, 2011 or on Feb. 1, 2012, the way they phrase it, which means it should cover 366 days. If they want to exclude coverage on Feb. 1, 2012, they should say it expires at 24:00 March 31, 2012.
     
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