a partner with a company

Langs Leear

Member
English - Indian
Hi, I am not sure if it is OK to say:

1. X is a partner with ABC Ltd.

Is it the same with (2) below?

2. X is a partner ABC Ltd.

If they are different, how are they different?
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    If an Indian organisation has "Limited" at the end of its name, it's a company with shareholders, not partners. A "partner" is the term used for a co-owner of/holder of a stake in a partnership firm (which is different from a company).

    In closely held companies (small companies with only a few shareholders), the shareholders might refer to each other as partners but that'd be an informal use of the word.

    X is a partner ABC Ltd.
    This isn't grammatical in any case. You need "with" (or "of" or "at") before the name of the organisation.
     
    Last edited:

    Langs Leear

    Member
    English - Indian
    Thank you, Barque.

    Say ABC is a partnership company. X, Y, and Z are the partners to each other. What do you say when you say they or any one of them are (a) partner(s) with reference to the company?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    A partnership (run by partners) is indeed a different legal entity from a limited company (run by its directors). But there are other types of partner and it’s not entirely clear what type of partnership is meant here. For example, companies often enter into official business relationships with each other, whereby they become “trading partners”. In such cases, the relationship could be described by saying that ABC Ltd is a trading partner of XYZ Ltd.
     

    Langs Leear

    Member
    English - Indian
    Thank you for your response, lingobingo.

    I am not aware of the technicalities of and the differences between these business organization types. I feel somehow inspired by what you and barque have written here to find out more about these.

    I should have been clearer in my query. My question was about the preposition(s) appropriate in the context given above, be it a company or a partnership or anything of that sort.

    To restate my query: A, B, and C have a partnership firm. I think A, B, and C are partners to each other. In other words, each one of them is a partner of the others--A is B('s) and C's partner; B is A('s) and C's partner; and C is A('s) and B's partner. What preposition do you use to relate the partners to the firm (X)?

    3. A, B, and C are partners at X.
    4. A, B, and C are partners in X.
    5. A, B, and C are partners with X.
    or any other preposition?

    The preposition at (3) seems to work for the sense I want to convey. Is it OK, or do you have any suggestions? Not sure of (4). The construction with with (5) seems to mean something else than what I want the sentence to mean. (4) seems to be rather talking about the three people partnering with X while its says nothing about any relationship (e.g., friends, brothers, strangers, or partners who jointly run a partnership firm).

    Could you share your views?
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    The appropriate word can change depending on whether you're referring to only one or some of the partners.

    If I was referring to one of several partners, I might use any of the choices in #4, or "in".
    If I was referring to more than one partner, but not all, I don't think I'd use "with". I might use "at" or "in".
    If I was referring to all the partners, I'd use "are the partners of" or "are partners in".
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think A, B, and C are partners to each other.
    No, they are just partners. You cannot be a partner on your own.

    3. A, B, and C are partners at X.:tick:

    Partners in would be used if you weren't using the name of the business:
    John and Peter are partners in their father's car dealership.​
    (though "at" could be used here as well)

    Partners with suggests a relationship between two businesses rather than ownership of one.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In the UK, and probably elsewhere, partnerships (as opposed to limited companies) are most common in medical, law and accountancy practices.

    When describing the relationship of the partners to the partnership itself, I think the preposition “in” is most common. But “at” is also used, especially when the actual name of the partnership is stated.

    Not long ago all six partners in the Washington law firm of Nussbaum and Wald …
    One of the partners in this delightful little gallery is Australian
    In private practice he is a partner at Allen & Overy LLP
    Currently he is a partner at EY UK and Ireland

    When describing the relationship of the partners to each other, no preposition is normally used. As Uncle Jack has said, we would just say that they’re partners, or business partners.
     

    Langs Leear

    Member
    English - Indian
    When I wrote partners to each other, I was trying to define or refer to the relation/ship among A, B, and C (which relation the preposition to in this case defines or determines--I am not sure if genitives as in my/his/your partner or of-constructions, though perhaps awkward, as in intelligent partner of the wealthy but intellectually dull businessman in their footwear business can also define this relation) by way of distinguishing it from the relationship that obtains between the three persons on one hand and their partnership firm on the other. It was rather like the language of dictionary definitions, which would be very roundabout, awkward, and even weird if used in our day-to-day conversational contexts.

    That said, I am not sure if what I said made sense, if read from this angle. Did that sound very weird and laborious? Or was that not acceptable at all in a dictionary way?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It’s very difficult to work out what you’re asking. The phrase “partners to each other” is not idiomatic. It’s like saying that a couple are lovers to each other, instead of just lovers. As for the longer phrase “intelligent partner of the wealthy but intellectually dull businessman in their footwear business” – well, what can I say? It’s hard to imagine what possible context could merit such a strange and apparently contradictory sentence.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I think A, B, and C are partners to each other. In other words, each one of them is a partner of the others--A is B('s) and C's partner; B is A('s) and C's partner;
    If there is a context in which you specifically need to say that A is a partner in relation to B, "of" works best.

    Does B work for A?
    No, B is one of his partners.
     
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