a partner with

Alie Babel

Senior Member
French - France
Hi there,

Is there any kind of difference between those two sentences?

XXX becomes an official festival partner with the Emmy Awards.
XXX becomes an official festival partner of the Emmy Awards.

I would use the second one but some US people (from California) have used the first one in a press release [not public yet, and the Emmy Awards are just an example I give, no scoop here!] and I wonder if I miss a nuance.

I knew "to partner with" but "a partner with" sounds strange to me.
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I agree that “of” is better. And there are plenty of examples of it being used in that context.

    But I can see that someone might consider it inappropriate to say that a company was a corporate partner of a set of awards (rather than the organisation responsible for those awards).
     
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    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    XXX becomes an official festival partner with the Emmy Awards.
    XXX becomes an official festival partner of the Emmy Awards.
    It may be useful to set the example in a similar context:

    He became a partner in/of/with the firm.

    I would expect to hear
    He became a partner in the firm. -> he took the position of partner within the firm.
    He became a partner with the firm.-> this is acceptable without further context, but takes on another meaning if the sentence/context is extended -> "He became a partner with the firm in the building of a bridge." This would mean that he and the firm were quite separate but they both worked on the building of the bridge.
    He became a partner of the firm.-> this is only acceptable if there is a time clause to follow it - "He became a partner of the firm in 1998/when his father died, etc."

    Therefore, to help us to give an accurate answer you need to supply more context.
     
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    Alie Babel

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Thank you!

    More information: the winners of this foreign festival will be allowed to submit their work for [let's say] Gotham Award consideration.
    And the aim is to expand the scope of the Gotham Awards to more international productions.

    And the sentence isn't: XXX becomes an official festival partner with the organization that presents the Gotham Awards in [any project].
    But: XXX becomes an official festival partner with the Gotham Awards.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    XXX becomes an official festival partner with the Gotham Awards
    cannot mean
    the winners of this foreign festival will be allowed to submit their work for [let's say] Gotham Award consideration.

    A partner is someone (usually, but not always) of equal status who is responsible for the same business. If you and I are partners in a bakery, we both make and sell bread.
     

    Alie Babel

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Well, I didn't conclude that partnership nor its terms or the official communication in English!
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    You seem to be at cross-purposes? Paul appears to be taking partner to mean an individual (like a solicitor who would be described as a partner in a law firm), whereas the subject here is presumably a company being a co-sponsor — a.k.a. [festival] partner — of those awards.

    As I said in #2, using “of” seems to be the norm:

    Pinewood Studios tweet: Proud to be a festival partner of the @londongamesfest

    SCI-FI-LONDON is proud to once again be the official festival partner of the Arthur C. Clarke Award​
     
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    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    You seem to be at cross-purposes?
    I don't think so - a partner in a law firm and a partner in a joint exercise are the same thing - they conduct (usually on equal terms) the business of the firm or event. They have a joint and several responsibility for the success of the firm/event.

    However, the OP has given confusing context:

    XXX becomes an official festival partner with the Gotham Awards.

    the winners of this foreign festival will be allowed to submit their work for [let's say] Gotham Award consideration.
    And the aim is to expand the scope of the Gotham Awards to more international productions.

    It seems that the Gotham Awards is an event at which a Gotham Award is given away.

    A festival partner is someone (or any legal entity) that has a joint and several responsibility for the success of the festival.

    The relationship between the festival and the Gotham Awards is unclear.
     

    Alie Babel

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Confusing context: I confirm the original text (with that exact use of the plural and singular forms) is confusing and that's the reason why I made that post :)

    I don't know why they wrote that way ("with" instead of "of"). And I don't have further info.

    Anyway thank you lingbingo and Paul!
     
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