a payload buried in its code

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qizi

Senior Member
Chinese
Even so, he still had to purge a rogue piece of software from his network recently. A bootlegged clip from the latest vampire movie (“New Moon”) downloaded by his tweenage daughter had a particularly virulent payload buried in its code. ——The Economist
I don't understant the blue part. What does the writer mean by "a payload buried in its code"? Is it a technical term?
Thanks in advance.:)
 
  • Niblib

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    "Code" is a computer term. It's basicaly saying "The movie had a virus."
     

    qizi

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thank you, Niblib. But could you explain a little bit more? I am still confused about the connection between "payload" and "its code". Why did the writer say "buried"?
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    The payload was not part of the original code. (A "payload" is often the term used for the explosive portion of a bomb or missile.) The code had been altered to include a virus. The virus was hidden so that it wasn't apparent to the daughter that she was downloading anything but a clip of a recent movie.
     

    Niblib

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    They're all technical terms, related to computers. I'll try and explain why each one is used but im not a computer tech so I may complicate things. Here goes.
    payload: When used as a military term it's a bomb. "the aircraft dropped it's payload." In the same way a bomb can destroy a house, a virus can destroy a computer.
    It's code: The "bricks and mortar" of a program. The code is what builds the movie (and the virus).
    Buried: Is often used by native speakers to say "hidden".
    So to summerise:
    "The virus was hidden in the building blocks of the movie"

    Edit:
    James's is probably better explained.
     
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