a penny candy

jugen

Senior Member
English USA
Hello Forum,
I would like to use a single German word (or maybe two) to name a small, very cheap piece of German candy (countable) that would be available during the 1920's when inflation was at its peak. The context will be something like "[This amount - 5000 Milliarden] will probably not be enough to purchase a [penny candy]..." I will appreciate all suggestions.
jugen
 
  • jugen

    Senior Member
    English USA
    So would it be appropriate to say " to purchase a Dr. Hillers"?

    Thank you and saludos a Mafalda.
     

    Lhost Vokus

    Senior Member
    German
    In my childhood we used the word "Pfenniglutscher". When you search for "Hirsch Rote Kirschen, Lollis mit Kirsch-Geschmack" you will find the candy, we bought a lot of years ago as single candy. But for the word "Pfenniglutscher" i couldn't find another source than my memory. And of course my childhood is not in the twenties.
     

    jugen

    Senior Member
    English USA
    I like this very much, Lhost Vokus, even if it is not from the 20's. It sounds authentic and I'm going to use it unless I get a more time-appropriate response. (and I found this)
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Hi, I also found "Pfennigbonbon" but this is newer.

    The traditional Lutscher has a wooden stick to hold it in the hand.
    In my time the Bonbon part was longer, and we called it "Stundenlutscher".
    Children liked it very much. Me to.

    I found a term "Pfennigbonbon" but according to sources I found only after the 1930ths, and at least in my region it was never common when I was a child, but I was born 1954.

    "Pfenniglutscher" "sounds" mutch better than "Pfennigbonbon".
     

    jugen

    Senior Member
    English USA
    Thanks, Hutschi! I'm learning a lot! I think i will use "Pfenniglutscher" - less Gallic-sounding :rolleyes:
     

    Schlabberlatz

    Senior Member
    German - Germany
    It’s possible that the (modern) lollipop was introduced as late as 1908, and in the U.S.A. Lollipop - Wikipedia So maybe "Lutscher" were not popular in Germany in the 1920s. I don’t know how much authenticity you’re striving for. You could use "Bonbon", I think, or perhaps "Zuckerstange". But of course it cannot be ruled out that "Lutscher" were popular back then, at least not without some research/googling.
     

    jugen

    Senior Member
    English USA
    Well, this is interesting, Schlabberlatz. I can probably sacrifice a bit of authenticity for the sake of the smallest, cheapest kind of German
    candy imaginable. Now I don't think I want to use "Lutscher" - too elaborate with the stick. I may return to Pfennigbonbon, with thanks to Hutschi and the rest of you.
     
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