A personal / verbos con A

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melissinda

Senior Member
USA, english
would anyone be able to explain to me why it is a sometimes proceeds an infinitive.
for example "aprender a bailer" why not simply "aprender bailar"

also. when is it necessary to use "a" before a person.
for example: el conoce a ella.
is it with all indirect objects?

thanks so much!
 
  • El ringo feroz

    Senior Member
    España - español
    1. I don't really know the answer for your first question. This is my opinion:
    In English, you say "Learn dancing", and "dancing" is almost a substantive; whilst in Spanish "bailar" is clearly a verb, and it wouldn't make sense at all to say "aprender bailar".

    2. If there is a direct object meaning "person", "people" and so on, an "a" should always be used. Be careful: in the sentence "Él conoce a ella", "a ella" is not the indirect object, but the direct one. Look at these examples:
    "Él la quiere" - "Él quiere a ella"
    "Víctor la presentó" - "Víctor presentó a María"
    "Yo te deseo" - "Yo deseo a Ana".
    Try substituting the direct object for another thing:
    "Él quiere un plátano"
    "Víctor presentó un proyecto"
    "Yo deseo un pastel".
    Of course, in some cases you can also add an indirect object:
    "Víctor presentó un proyecto a sus amigos".
    "Víctor presentó a María a sus amigos".
    If you put the phrases in passive, the direct object is then the subject:
    "Ana es desada por mí".
    "Laura es querida por mí".
    "María fue presentada por Víctor (a sus amigos)".
    Anyway, my advice is that you have a look at a Spanish handbook, were you'll surely find all these ideas in a rather clearer and more exact way than mine.

    Welcome to the forum! :)
     

    Zokie

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain)
    En el ejemplo que pones, el "a" es necesario porque viene dado por el mismo verbo:

    "Aprender a hacer algo"

    Piensa en ejemplos de lengua inglesa: Algunos verbos van seguidos infinitivo con to, otros con gerundio, otros tienen una estructura de verbo + objeto + infinitivo.
    Me temo que no tiene más explicación que la propia estructura del verbo, que hay que aprender.
     

    Fernita

    Senior Member
    castellano de Argentina.
    Hi Melissinda and welcome!

    -First question:
    aprender a + infinitive
    aprender a bailar/cantar/hablar/...
    Or:
    aprender + noun
    Aprender baile/danzas/canto/idiomas

    -Second question: yes, it's used with indirect objects.
    conocer a alguien
    mirar a alguien
    invitar a alguien

    Saludos.
     

    Zokie

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain)
    ah, por cierto:

    "el conoce a ella"*es una frase que suena muy extraña:

    1) en español no solemos decir el sujeto cuando éste un pronombre, a menos que lo queramos enfatizar.

    2) no diríamos a ella, sino "la"

    He knows him
    La conoce
     

    melissinda

    Senior Member
    USA, english
    thank you for the responses! i have looked through a few grammar books but haven't found anything very clear in explaination. so, would it be correct to say in command for "ayuda a ellos" because "ayuda ellos" seems so wrong... or i guess "que les ayudes" would work... just trying to grasp this "a" thing.

    the a with an infinitive is curious to me because in english we would say "to learn to dance is a difficult" for example. but in spanish you wouldn't say "aprender bailer es dificil"... whatabout "to be able to leave is not possible" "no es posible poder salir" or is it "poder a salir"

    thanks again for any help that can be offered in my continuing search for understanding.
     

    Fernita

    Senior Member
    castellano de Argentina.
    In a command, it's: "Ayúdalos" one word.
    Ayúdame
    Ayúdala
    Ayúdalo
    Ayúdalos

    Aprender a bailar es difícil.

    It's "No es posible poder salir" poder doesn't take a preposition.
    :)
     

    JimmyJ

    Member
    United States/English
    Hi Melissinda and welcome!

    -First question:
    aprender a + infinitive
    aprender a bailar/cantar/hablar/...
    Or:
    aprender + noun
    Aprender baile/danzas/canto/idiomas

    -Second question: yes, it's used with indirect objects.
    conocer a alguien
    mirar a alguien
    invitar a alguien

    Saludos.
    Hi Fernita,
    I think the examples you listed as indirect objects are, instead, direct objects.
    :)
     
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