A phrasal verb: "take up" ??

Symrna

Member
somewhere on Earth
Dear native moderators,

A few days , almost over 30 thousand students in our country took one of those foreign language proficiency exams which are set every year to select students for higher education.

I allege that the following question is wrong, given the fact that correct answer is -in official key- "B-take up". What's your take on the matter?

It didn’t happen all at once, but before long the business really began to ----, and they started to make a profit.

A) look back
B) take up
C) point out
D) keep on
E) try out

What does take up mean here? I coudn't make out the meaning. The context is insufficient to have a guess. Could it be take off, or pick up?
 
  • kayokid

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    I vote for either of your choices and none of the listed ones. I don't understand what "take up" is. It looks to me like they wanted part of both your answers and took "take (from take off) and up (from pick up)" and put them together.
     

    englishman

    Senior Member
    English England
    kayokid said:
    I vote for either of your choices and none of the listed ones. I don't understand what "take up" is. It looks to me like they wanted part of both your answers and took "take (from take off) and up (from pick up)" and put them together.
    I also agree with your analysis - the chosen answer is meaningless, in BE at least.
     

    Otter

    Senior Member
    English/American
    Symrna said:
    Dear native moderators,

    A few days , almost over 30 thousand students in our country took one of those foreign language proficiency exams which are set every year to select students for higher education.

    I allege that the following question is wrong, given the fact that correct answer is -in official key- "B-take up". What's your take on the matter?

    It didn’t happen all at once, but before long the business really began to ----, and they started to make a profit.

    A) look back
    B) take up
    C) point out
    D) keep on
    E) try out

    What does take up mean here? I coudn't make out the meaning. The context is insufficient to have a guess. Could it be take off, or pick up?
    I vote for 'Take Off'. 'Pick up' doesn't indicate enough to really make a profit. 'take off' implies success. And I agree none of A-B makes sense in the context of sentence.
     

    Nick

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I, too, think that none of the answers are good. I'd use take off or maybe take flight.

    Take up doesn't make sense here in American English. In other contexts, it means to begin or to start (eg: She's lost 15 pounds since she decided to take up jogging every morning.)
     

    Symrna

    Member
    somewhere on Earth
    Thank you all, mates:) Much appreciated!

    You made my mind clear, indeed:)

    Thanks again!
     
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