A picture is given / has been given

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dark.resurrection

Senior Member
Farsi
Hello,
I just became doubtful about whether or not I should use a picture is give in the following context.
Imagine you have a book, and you are showing it to people pointing out that there is a picture on this page of the book, should we say a picture is given or a picture has been given?
I was thinking that a picture is given is the passive voice for "They give you a picture" and a picture has been given means " they have given a picture" so the latter sounds to be true, but if that is the case, how can we justify " it is done" when you want to mention that you have finished something. :confused::confused::confused:
 
  • DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Sorry, but I really don't understand what you're trying to ask here. :confused:

    When you say that there is this book with a picture in it, which you're showing to somebody, do you mean by "a picture is given" that a picture was "taken" (in other words, somebody has photographed something and then put the picture of it in the book?).
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    … should we say a picture is given or a picture has been given?
    Neither of those makes any obvious sense in the situation you describe. Assuming you’re showing someone an image of something just discussed in a book, you could point at the illustration and say: “Look. Here’s a picture of it.”
    … how can we justify " it is done" when you want to mention that you have finished something. :confused::confused::confused:
    This has absolutely nothing to do with pointing out a picture in a book. “It is done” is a fairly common way of saying that some deed or action that had been planned (especially an unpleasant one) has now been carried out.
     

    dark.resurrection

    Senior Member
    Farsi
    Sorry, but I really don't understand what you're trying to ask here. :confused:

    When you say that there is this book with a picture in it, which you're showing to somebody, do you mean by "a picture is given" that a picture was "taken" (in other words, somebody has photographed something and then put the picture of it in the book?).
    Let me elaborate on the problem a little bit, the truth is that I have a feeling that the passive voice of the simple present does not always live up to the definition of the simple present, I would like to mention another situation since perhaps the example set does not actually manifest the real question.
    Imagine you have confided in someone and told that person a secret and that person has revealed your secret now you are are moaning about it to your friends, is it true to say
    My secret is revealed
    I have a feeling that this sentence somehow does not mean, "They reveal my secret all the time" and instead it sort of means " My secret has been revealed" and sort of refers to this specific situation
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Let me elaborate on the problem a little bit, the truth is that I have a feeling that the passive voice of the simple present does not always live up to the definition of the simple present, I would like to mention another situation since perhaps the example set does not actually manifest the real question.
    Imagine you have confided in someone and told that person a secret and that person has revealed your secret now you are are moaning about it to your friends, is it true to say
    My secret is revealed
    I have a feeling that this sentence somehow does not mean, "They reveal my secret all the time" and instead it sort of means " My secret has been revealed" and sort of refers to this specific situation
    Ah, yes: I see what you mean. :idea:

    That is not, I would say, a true passive of the simple present tense, where the active voice equivalent would be "[somebody] reveals my secret". Logically, as you correctly say, somebody must have already revealed the secret, in the past. So, it's grammatically more like using the past participle "revealed" as an adjective, where the verb "is" in the sentence is the simple present tense of the verb 'to be'.

    That's actually quite a common construction in English. :)
     

    dark.resurrection

    Senior Member
    Farsi
    Ah, yes: I see what you mean. :idea:

    That is not, I would say, a true passive of the simple present tense, where the active voice equivalent would be "[somebody] reveals my secret". Logically, as you correctly say, somebody must have already revealed the secret, in the past. So, it's grammatically more like using the past participle "revealed" as an adjective, where the verb "is" in the sentence is the simple present tense of the verb 'to be'.

    That's actually quite a common construction in English. :)
    DonnyB, I don't know how to thank you, that was comprehensive, thank you mate. :thumbsup::)
     
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