a picture of/about a wedding

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Lin-Lin

Member
Chinese
Hi, everyone.

I know that I should use the preposition "of" if I refer to the person in a picture, like "a picture of my sister". Then which preposition should I use when talking about the occasion in the picture, "of" or "about"?

For example, if I show some pictures to a friend, is it "The first picture is of a wedding" or "The first picture is about a wedding"? Or are there any other options?

Thank you.
 
  • Lin-Lin

    Member
    Chinese
    What is shown in the picture? Is it just any old wedding, or your wedding, or the wedding of someone you know? Did you go to the wedding?
    Let's say, it's my parents' wedding, and the picture shows the newlyweds and their families.
     
    Last edited:

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    This is a picture of my parents at their wedding.
    This is a picture from my parents' wedding.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    :thumbsup: Or 'This is a picture of my parent's wedding.'

    And in all of these, we would be very likely to omit 'a picture of/from'. It's obvious it's a picture, so there's no need to say it.
     

    Lin-Lin

    Member
    Chinese
    Many Thanks :)

    So is it "this is my parent's wedding"?

    And if there are more than one picture and I have to mention it's the "first one", can it be "the first one is of my parent's wedding"? I don't know if it's weird that "of" follows "is".
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Not weird at all: it's correct.

    Coming back to your original question: if you said "The first picture is about a wedding" it would suggest that the photo was not of the wedding itself but referred to it, perhaps symbolically. For example, here is a photo about a wedding:

    1593677305469.png
     
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