a picture of Bob's/a picture of Bob

wholegrain

Senior Member
French
<< Topic: a picture of Bob's/a picture of Bob >>

What's the difference between the two?
 
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  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    A picture of Bob's = one of the pictures that Bob owns
    A picture of Bob = a picture depicting Bob.
     

    wholegrain

    Senior Member
    French
    It's really not that strange.

    Think of "a picture of Bob's" as being equal to "one of Bob's pictures."

    A picture of Bob's = une des photos de Bob
    A picture of Bob = une photo de Bob
    I don't think the first one is correct, it implies he has more than one picture.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    It's absolutely standard, wholegrain. If you do a search of the English Only forum with search term double genitive you'll find lots of previous threads.

    Would "a picture of yours" and "a picture of you" be parallel constructions as of that of the two above?
    Yes:)
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I don't think the first one is correct, it implies he has more than one picture.
    That doesn't make it incorrect. Even if there was something that you absolutely knew Bob had only one of (a nose of Bob's), the structure would still be grammatically correct. The problem then would be semantic or logical.
     
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