a picture of me smiling vs a picture of my smiling

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nike20008

Senior Member
French
The rule says we should use the possessive before gerunds .
So which one is correct.
A) a picture of me smiling
B) a picture of my smiling

Bye the way I've seen people write stuff like "me and my friend getting ready for the party under their Instagram pictures

Shouldnt it be "me and my friend's (our)getting ready for the party ".
 
  • london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    The rule says we should use the possessive before gerunds .
    So which one is correct.
    A) a picture of me smiling:tick:
    B) a picture of my smiling:cross:

    Bye the way I've seen people write stuff like "me and my friend getting ready for the party under their Instagram pictures:tick:

    Shouldnt it be "me and my friend's (our)getting ready for the party ":cross:.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    It isn't a gerund, it's a participle used as an adjective after the noun or pronoun, or, as a short form of a clause, whichever way one wishes to think about it.

    This is a picture of Mary/my wife/her sitting in the Cafe Florian/as she sits in the Cafe Florian.
    This is a picture of me smiling/ as I smile/ while I'm smiling.
    The same applies to the second example. This is a photo of us as we were getting ready for the party > This is a photo of us getting ready for the party.

    This business of 'gerunds' needing a possessive is old-fashioned, except in very limited situations. For example, when the '- ing' form (participle gerund) is the subject of a sentence and could have an article in front of it.

    His swimming is abolutely wonderful, but his brother's is hopeless.
    [The swimming of him/the way he swims/ the standard of his swimming]
     
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    nike20008

    Senior Member
    French
    This business of 'gerunds' needing a possessive is old-fashioned, except in very limited situations. For example, when the '- ing' form (participle:warning:) is the subject of a sentence and could have an article in front of it.

    His swimming is abolutely wonderful, but his brother's is hopeless.
    [The swimming of him/the way he swims/ the standard of his swimming]
    Thanks for answering .You cleared almost all my doubts. I got a question,though. the ing form in the example you provided is a gerund. Why did you call it a participle?
     
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    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hermione, I think Nike's asking about your example with "his swimming", where "his swimming" is the subject of a verb.
     

    nike20008

    Senior Member
    French
    This business of 'gerunds' needing a possessive is old-fashioned, except in very limited situations. For example, when the '- ing' form (participle) is the subject of a sentence and could have an article in front of it.

    His swimming is abolutely wonderful, but his brother's is hopeless.
    [The swimming of him/the way he swims/ the standard of his swimming]
    I think you meant gerund not participle
    A participle can't be the subject of a sentence by itself .It can be part of the subject but not the subject itself. The participle is always attached to something it modifies.
     
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    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Ah, I see, thank you, Loob.
    I'm sorry about being misleading, nike and I've corrected it.

    The '-ing form' is not called 'a participle' if it is the subject or object of a sentence. Some people might call it a 'gerund' if there's no modifier or article to the word and if it directly follows a preposition. Otherwise, the '-ing word' is either a verbal-noun, which is treated as and behaves like a noun; or it's a participle representing a reduced clause.

    How about that as a brief explanation of 'Why a picture of my smiling' is not correct?
     
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