"a picture of Paris" OR "a Paris picture"

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Astris

New Member
French
Hello all,

I'm wondering what the best sentence is between those two. What is the most grammatically correct one ? Which one sounds better to you ? Is one more commonly used in one country ? (exemple : UK vs US) ?

Thank you for you help ! :)
 
  • SwissPete

    Senior Member
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    :) Welcome to the forum.

    Probably "A picture of Paris", but context is necessary to be sure.

    Do you have a complete sentence with this expression?
     

    Astris

    New Member
    French
    Thank you for your reply :)

    Basically, there is no context, what would people say most naturally : "This is my picture of Paris" or "This is my Paris' picture" ? (Paris being a generic word here, no mention of any monument or specific place)

    Thanks !
     

    SwissPete

    Senior Member
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    In this case, then definitely: "This is my picture of Paris".

    Also: "These are my pictures of France".
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Devoid of context, "This is my picture of Paris" sounds more natural.

    But imagine I have two sets of holiday photos which I'm showing you. I'd say "These are my Paris photos, and those are my Rome photos."
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    A "picture of Paris" suggests to me a picture whose subject is Paris. It may depict a representative part of, or scene from, the city. It could be an aerial view of the whole, or of a representative part, of the city.

    In a "Paris picture", the relationship between the city and the picture is more vaguely defined. It could, for example, be a picture of Big Ben that was held in a vault in Paris for a long period.
     
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