A piece of huge rock blocked my trudging along a stream

arueng

Senior Member
CHINESE
A piece of huge rock blocked my trudging along a stream in a mountain. While I was wondering if there is a way out, a piece of cloud started rising high above. It occurred to me that I might as well sit down and appreciate the cloud for a while.

Hi,
Is it necessary for me to write "a piece of huge rock" or just simply "a huge rock" in the above context? Thanks.
 
  • Majorbloodnock

    Senior Member
    British English
    "A piece of huge rock" doesn't make sense, I'm afraid. If you want to comment on the size of a piece of rock, you're describing the piece, not the rock, leaving you with the phrase "a huge piece of rock".

    However, whether or not you want to describe the boulder as a rock or a piece of rock is entirely up to you; both could be perfectly appropriate.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    If you were in a mountain, you wouldn't be able to see a cloud!

    While you could say a huge [piece of] rock you would be unlikely to say a piece of cloud. Simply a cloud will do.
     

    arueng

    Senior Member
    CHINESE
    "A piece of huge rock" doesn't make sense, I'm afraid. If you want to comment on the size of a piece of rock, you're describing the piece, not the rock, leaving you with the phrase "a huge piece of rock".

    However, whether or not you want to describe the boulder as a rock or a piece of rock is entirely up to you; both could be perfectly appropriate.
    Thanks, Major.

    But what are the main differences between a boulder and a piece of huge rock? They are about the same to me.


    If you were in a mountain, you wouldn't be able to see a cloud!

    While you could say a huge [piece of] rock you would be unlikely to say a piece of cloud. Simply a cloud will do.
    Thanks, e2efour.

    After chewing on your advice, I rewrote my original a bit. Does it sound good to you now?


    A huge boulder on a mountain blocked my trudging along a stream. While I was wondering if there was a way out, a white cloud started rising high above. It struck me that I might as well sit down and appreciate the cloud for a while.
     

    arueng

    Senior Member
    CHINESE
    Instead of "blocked my trudging" it would be more natural to write "blocked me as I trudged" or "blocked my path as I trudged".
    Thanks, e2efour, for your correction.

    Actually, the lines in question are the English rendition of a couple verses in a classic Chinese poem.

    Here are many related images for your reference: http://www.google.com.tw/images?um=1&hl=zh-TW&rlz=1T4GGLJ_enTW364TW364&tbs=isch%3A1&sa=1&q=%E8%A1%8C%E5%88%B0%E6%B0%B4%E7%AA%AE%E8%99%95+%E5%9D%90%E7%9C%8B%E9%9B%B2%E8%B5%B7%E6%99%82+&btnG=%E6%90%9C%E5%B0%8B&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    The language of poetry is, of course, different.
    By the way, although "in a mountain" sounds odd to me, "in the mountains" would not mean inside the mountain(s) and would sound perfectly normal.
     
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