A place kick in football that starts play.

Arabic, French
#1
Good evening!
A place kick in football
that starts play at the beginning of a half or after a team has scored.
I don't get the highlighted part,at all,Especially with "place" into the phrase.

What could be place here;an adjective?
When I'd got rid of "place" I understood the meaning"a kick in football that starts....","a hit in football that starts......."
 
  • grubble

    Senior Member
    British English
    #2
    Hello A-c. This doesn't look like a complete sentence. Can you give the text that comes before "a place"?

    Also, which country is this from. Different countries refer to "football" by different names. Do you mean American football or soccer or something else?
     

    WyomingSue

    Senior Member
    English--USA
    #3
    It's a "place kick" in the sense that the ball is placed on a tee (a little holder) or is held by another person on the ground, and the ball is kicked from that place. The other kind of a kick is a punt, when the ball is snapped (passed) back to the kicker, who then drops the ball to kick it.

    http://www.wsutoday.wsu.edu/Content/Publications/PlaceKick-2224-04-10.jpg

    This is terminology for American football.
     
    Last edited:
    Arabic, French
    #4
    Thank you,thank you,thank you a lot .
    It's American Football,Grubble,but I think it can refer to the white spot in the soccer too?

    So,place here is an adjective for kick??
     

    kalamazoo

    Senior Member
    US, English
    #6
    A "place kick" is a technical term in American football. One of the team members is a "kicker" or "placekicker" whose main (only) job is to make place kicks.
     

    Thomas Veil

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    #8
    "Place" is a noun used as an adjective, like "car" in the phrase "car keys". Note that while nouns can be used to modify other nouns in this manner, there are still distinction between them and true adjectives; for instance, they can't be subject complements.
    "These keys are car" :cross:
    "This kick is place" :cross:
     
    English - England
    #9
    In Soccer, A place kick in football that starts play at the beginning of a half or after a team has scored, is an informal definition of a kick off. A place kick is not an expression which occurs in the rules of the game.

    It's sometimes used to mean a kick taken from a particular place on the ground, and would thus mean a penalty kick, a kick off, a free kick, a corner kick, but not, I think, a goal kick, for which the rules state the ball is kicked from any point within the goal area by a player of the defending team, which clearly means that the defending team can choose the place from which the kick is taken.

    In rugby a place kick is a term used in the rules, and clearly means a kick taken after the ball has been placed on the ground, as opposed to a drop kick or a punt.
     
    Arabic, French
    #10
    "Place" is a noun used as an adjective, like "car" in the phrase "car keys". Note that while nouns can be used to modify other nouns in this manner, there are still distinction between them and true adjectives; for instance, they can't be subject complements.
    "These keys are car" :cross:
    "This kick is place" :cross:
    Thank you a lot.
    Thomas Tompion,yes you are not wide off the track,it's about kick off definition.
     
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