a pleasure talking to you

Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi,

I met someone online and after I talked to her for a while, I said:

It's a pleasure talking to you.

I wonder if it's natural to use the bold. I didn't say that after we finished our conversation, in the middle of it, maybe.

Thanks a lot
 
  • Dretagoto

    Senior Member
    Inglés británico
    Yes, that's absolutely natural. The most common thing is to say "it was a pleasure talking to you", after the conversation is finished (as I suspect you know), but as a way to describe your current enjoyment of the conversation then it's fine.

    That said, because "pleasure talking to you" is more often associated with "was", then there may be other, more preferable, ways to express your sentiment, but your usage is not wrong.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Thanks a lot, Dretagoto.

    Is it common to say things like "It's a pleasure talking to you" in a conversation, or maybe it's much more common to use it simply after the conversation is finished?
     

    Dretagoto

    Senior Member
    Inglés británico
    It's more common to say it afterwards, but there's no reason not to say it in conversation, but I'd be more likely to say, for example, something like "I'm really enjoying this chat with you" or "it's nice talking with you like this".
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Hi. I have a new question.

    I was chatting with a man (let's call him J) in an English club. We discussed the usage of two words "removed" and "kicked". The context was about a man who said bad things about black people and was removed/kicked from the online conversation. (an online group have a conversation). J said "removed" is the right word and I said "kicked". I believed J was wrong. Later I asked some native speakers and was told that both were right to use.

    Then I said to J I made a mistake, I added "It's always a pleasure to learn from you". (I want to be polite and I did learn something from him, here, to use the word "remove")

    Is the bold natural in this context?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top