A poem

I'm writing a poem in German (not school related) and would like someone to check it over if they're willing. I might add to it later on.
die Bergspitze
Ich stehe an die Bergspitze
Die Luft klar und kalt
der Wind in meinem Rücker
Ich stehe am Rande
Wogeden
Und ich fallen
Kaputt
 
  • Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Have a good morning.

    Hallo, Whitewolf of Melnibone, sei herzlich willkommen im Forum.

    1. Rechtschreibung/Grammatik

    Die Bergspitze (Überschrift startet mit Großbuchstaben, wie am Satzanfang)
    Ich stehe auf der Bergspitze ("an die" funktioniert nicht. Beispiel wäre: Ich lehne mich an die Bergspitze. - Dazu müsste ich ein Riese sein ?)
    Die Luft klar und kalt
    Der Wind in meinem Rücken ("Der" mit Großbuchstaben, entsprechend des Stils des Gedichtes. Es ist heute wenig üblich, alle Zeilen mit Großbuchstaben zu beginnen, aber möglich. "Rücker" war sicher ein Tippfehler.)
    Ich stehe am Rande
    Wogeden (Ich verstehe das Wort nicht. Es ist ein Tippfehler, ich kann ihn nicht reparieren. Oder ist es ein Ortsname?)
    Und ich fallen ("fallen" muss konjugiert werden)
    Kaputt

    2. Wortwahl:
    "kaputt" wird normalerweise auf Gegenstände angewendet, nicht auf Menschen. (Ausnahme: Ich fühle mich kaputt. (... mit anderer Bedeutung.)
    "Wogeden" ist unverständlich.

    Bitte korrigiere zunächst die Fehler. Dann ist es schon recht gut.
    Ich kann vielleicht mehr sagen, aber ich möchte es erst verstehen.

    Grüße von Hutschi

    At your service.
     
    Last edited:
    Thanks for the welcome and I appriciate you taking time to review but could you post a bit more in English? I'm still learning. ;-) Danke
    Ich stehe an die (on the) Bergspitze, Ja?
    ich falle (I fall)?
     
    Last edited:

    sokol

    Senior Member
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    A poem does not have to follow the grammar and style you would and should use for ordinary texts, it is a question of style what to use, and when, and where. Some remarks from me:

    die Bergspitze Hutschi suggests you should begin with a capital letter ('Die'), and he's right here if you begin each phrase with a capital letter, so the capital letter is a question of consistency, or if you choose to be inconsistent in your poem you should choose so deliberately; therefore: either capital letter here, or no capital letters at the beginnings of the phrases below.
    Ich stehe an die Bergspitze As Hutschi has stated, it has to be 'auf der' Bergspitze.
    Die Luft klar und kalt If you say 'klar und kalt' then this is a breach of idiomatic use which would be 'kalt und klar': you may do so, in poems (almost) everything is allowed, but if you do it should be on purpose, and not by chance.
    der Wind in meinem Rücker Again, as Hutschi stated: 'Der' for the sake of consistency (or if you choose not to use capital letter at the beginning then do so consistently); and 'Rücker' is wrong: 'Rücken' correct. Another possibility would be 'Der Wind im Rücken' or 'Den Wind im Rücken', similar but not identical in meaning.
    Ich stehe am Rande The sentence is correct, but I cannot attribute any real meaning to it; probably you've meant 'Ich stehe am Abgrund', or even 'Ich stehe am Felsen/ an der Wand' or something like that.
    Wogeden Hutschi can't imagine what this word should mean, and I can't either.
    Und ich fallen 'Und ich falle', as Hutschi already has written, would be correct.
    Kaputt Again, as Hutschi said, usually not used with persons. If you use 'kaputt' with people you 'make' them to things - therefore, perfectly possible in a poem, but most likely not the meaning you intended. Probably you wanted to say something like 'Und ich falle/ Zu Tode' (which would be not colloquial language at all, but in a poem perfectly possible). Another one would be 'Und ich falle/ Hin' which has a slightly humoristic connotation - but you shouldn't use that one if you don't understand it, therefore I won't (definitely won't!) explain. ;)


    Thing is, with poems: you really should know German much better to properly know when to use what stylistic means in your poem in order to get a really good one - and to signify the meanings you want to.
     

    Suilan

    Senior Member
    Germany (NRW)
    If you say 'klar und kalt' then this is a breach of idiomatic use which would be 'kalt und klar'


    M.E. keine feste Wendung. Man kann beides sagen.

    "klar und kalt" -- 14300 hits
    "kalt und klar" -- 18500 hits

    (altavista.de)

    Instead of kaputt you could say: zerschmettert. That works on objects as well as bodies/bones.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    @Sokol - thank you for the help with translation. I did not suppose that Whitewolf wrote a poem in a language he does not understand.

    @ Whitewolf: "Kaputt" works perfectly well if you write about robots. Please write a corrected version. I suppose you need the poem.
     

    Suilan

    Senior Member
    Germany (NRW)
    Das ist keine Statistik, sondern eine Corpus-Analyse: gucken, wie andere Menschen reden. Jeder Sprecher kann halt doch nur Aussagen über seine eigene Ausdrucksweisen und die seiner nächsten Umgebung machen.
     

    sokol

    Senior Member
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    Das ist keine Statistik, sondern eine Corpus-Analyse: gucken, wie andere Menschen reden. Jeder Sprecher kann halt doch nur Aussagen über seine eigene Ausdrucksweisen und die seiner nächsten Umgebung machen.
    Eine Korpus-Analyse ist eine Statistik, aber passt schon! "Klar und kalt" finde ich übrigens wirklich extrem markiert, glaube auch, dass das zumindest in meinem Umfeld nie oder fast nie verwendet wird. Nun gut. ;)
     

    Suilan

    Senior Member
    Germany (NRW)
    Ah, das sieht vielleicht so aus, weil ich hier nur die Zahlen gepostet habe, die eigentliche Analyse der Daten aber dem geneigten User nur ans Herz gelegt.
     
    'Rücker' is wrong: 'Rücken' correctThing is, with poems: you really should know German much better to properly know when to use what stylistic means in your poem in order to get a really good one - and to signify the meanings you want to.
    Thank you all for your advice and taking time to help a newbie learner like me. ;-) I daresay i made a few of you laugh.I was writing the poem as more of an exercise than actual poetry.
    Kaputt Again, as Hutschi said, usually not used with personsWogeden Hutschi can't imagine what this word should mean, and I can't either.
    that's what I get for looking up a quick word with google. >.< I was trying to say swaying.Die BergspitzeIch stehe auf der BergspitzeDie Luft kalt und klarDer Wind im RückenIch stehe am Abgrund (I stand on the edge,no?)??(swaying)Unde ich falleZerschmettert
    @Sokol - thank you for the help with translation. I did not suppose that Whitewolf wrote a poem in a language he does not understand.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    wogeden -> wanke (first person singular, short form for "ich wanke". ("Ich" is some lines above).

    Please post the whole poem with your corrections. It is interesting to write poems in a foreign language.

    I also wrote poems in English :) So you see, I take it seriously. (And my English answers may contain grammar or other errors, too.)
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Die Bergspitze

    Ich stehe auf der Bergspitze
    Die Luft kalt und klar
    Der Wind in meinem Rücken
    Ich stehe am Rande
    Wanke
    Und ich falle
    Zerschmettert

    There remained only one small mistake: You have to use the dative form: Ich stehe auf der Bergspitze. (In English there remained only one rest of the former dative: "whom" - "der" is the corresponding form for a "female" word.

    "Auf" means "on", "on top of",
    "An" means here "beside", "nearby"

    Best regards
    Hutschi
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Ich stehe auf der Bergspitze
    Die Luft kalt und klar
    This wouldn't work either because there is no metre:
    ,Ich 'ste,he 'auf ,der 'Berg'spit,ze
    ,Die 'Luft 'kalt ,und 'klar
    (preceeding ' indicates stressed and preceeding , unstressed syllables)

    The following would work:
    ,Ich 'ste,he 'auf ,des 'Ber,ges 'Spit,ze
    ,Die 'Luft ,ist 'kalt ,und 'klar

    I leave the remaining lines to yourself to correct.

    Cheers,
    Bernd
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Maybe I am old fashoned, but I consider the sequence of a pentameter and a trimeter already sufficently "free". The remaining lines would be Ok then; each line has its own and consistent metre:

    Ich stehe auf des Berges Spitze
    Die Luft ist kalt und klar
    Der Wind in meinem Rücken
    Ich stehe am Rande
    Wanke
    Und ich falle
    Zerschmettert

    It is rather good now. :)
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top