A proper title for a certain specialization

Alex_Dispatch

Member
Russian
Hi, Everyone,

Please, help me with choosing a proper English title (name) for a university specialization.

The matter is that, in Russia, where I am from, there are sorts of pedagogical universities or separate pedagogical faculties within universities that provide training for students who would eventually graduate from such universities with B.A. and M.A. degrees in teaching subjects in higher schools.

Normally, in our CVs, if written in English, we, who once graduated from such a university, translate it as a Teacher Training University or a Pedagogical University and, I'm not quite sure that it would sound ok to a native of an English-speaking country.

My question is for those who live in English-speaking countries, how such universities (or faculties), are called in your country?

Thanks a lot for any advice!
 
  • S1m0n

    Senior Member
    English
    In the anglosphere (I might be wrong about UK usage), there are two kinds of tertiary* education. The first is a two year program, leading to a diploma, and the second is a four year program leading to a degree [BA]. Graduate degrees happen after that.
    All educational institutions in the west are accredited [by the government] as one or the other; often both, for differing programs. But if you graduate, there is no doubt what qualification you have earned.
    I'm not sure what to advise you if you are not sure where you stand. I'd suggest contacting the school and asking them what qualification they confer, and how it is accepted internationally. They'll know, but they might not want to say.
    *Primary education is grades 1-8 or ages 5-6 to 13-14. Secondary education is from there plus 4 or 5 years. Post-secondary or tertiary is after that.
     

    Alex_Dispatch

    Member
    Russian
    In the anglosphere (I might be wrong about UK usage), there are two kinds of tertiary* education. The first is a two year program, leading to a diploma, and the second is a four year program leading to a degree [BA]. Graduate degrees happen after that.
    All educational institutions in the west are accredited [by the government] as one or the other; often both, for differing programs. But if you graduate, there is no doubt what qualification you have earned.
    I'm not sure what to advise you if you are not sure where you stand. I'd suggest contacting the school and asking them what qualification they confer, and how it is accepted internationally. They'll know, but they might not want to say.
    *Primary education is grades 1-8 or ages 5-6 to 13-14. Secondary education is from there plus 4 or 5 years. Post-secondary or tertiary is after that.
    S1m0n, thank you for the detailed explanation. Probably, my description and the question itself are a little confusing, but I meant the following and I just wonder: How would be called, in your country, a university (or whatever educational organization and however it may be called) that train students to become future teachers in any sort of secondary high schools? In Russia, for instance, we have specialized pedagogical universities that train students to become future teachers in high schools.
     

    S1m0n

    Senior Member
    English
    In the west, a qualified secondary school teacher has either a three year BA in their subject area (math for a math teacher; literature for a lit teacher) plus a one year teacher training degree, (BA, Dipl Ed) or a four year joint program (B Ed) in both a subject area and in teaching.
     

    Alex_Dispatch

    Member
    Russian
    In the west, a qualified secondary school teacher has either a three year BA in their subject area (math for a math teacher; literature for a lit teacher) plus a one year teacher training degree, (BA, Dipl Ed) or a four year joint program (B Ed) in both a subject area and in teaching.
    Thank you, S1m0n! But how are, in your country, such educational organizations called (a university, a college or something else) where such qualified secondary school teachers are trained? And what would such qualified school teacher upon their graduation would write in their CV when mentioning a type of their educational organization they have graduated from?
     

    S1m0n

    Senior Member
    English
    They would have attended universities. Their degrees will either be, at a minimum, a Bachelor of Arts [or Sciences] with a diploma in education, or a Bachelor of Education with a specialisation in [subject area]. Or more likely a BA or BSc plus a Master of Arts in education, which is usually a five year program.
     
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    Alex_Dispatch

    Member
    Russian
    They would have attended universities. Their degrees will either be, at a minimum, a Bachelor of Arts [or Sciences] with a diploma in education, or a bacelor in Education with a specialisation in [subject area]. Or more likely a BA or BSc plus a Master of Arts in education, which is usually a five year program.
    Thank you, S1m0n, for this explanation!
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    This sounds like a question about how to list in a cv the administrative unit in the university where you earned a degree.

    In the US, universities usually are made up of multiple colleges or schools.
    Boston University, for example, awards degrees at the Bachelor's, Master's, and doctoral level.
    CVs of graduates of programs there would list
    <degree abbreviation> in <department or program>, Wheelock College of Education and Human Development, Boston University.
    At Loyola University Chicago, the corresponding line in the cv would be
    <degree abbreviation> in <department or program>, School of Education, Loyola University Chicago.

    I suggest the same format for a degree outside the US: Broad degree level as it is called in your country (translated into English rather than into the American equivalent degree), department from which you received the degree, school within the university, and university.
    For example, Master of Arts in Educational Management, Faculty of Educational Studies, Lomonosov Moscow State University.

    If your university doesn't have all three levels -- department, school, university, -- then just include whatever it does have.
     
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    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    we, who once graduated from such a university, translate it as a Teacher Training University
    In BE, these institutions are now historical. We used to call them "Colleges of Education" or, more informally, "Teacher-Training Colleges." However, a series of "reforms" in the 70s and 80's saw most, if not all of these absorbed by nearby universities; close, broaden their syllabuses, or change altogether.

    If you use "College of Education" then people will understand the equivalence.
     
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    By-the-sea

    Member
    English - Scotland
    In the UK and EU, they tend to be called things like University of Education, School of Education, Faculty of Education, Department of Education. It seems likely that one of these will be adequate for your purposes. Pedagogy is not used in the UK, but that does not mean it cannot be used in the Russian context.

    The phrase 'teacher training' is being replaced with 'teacher education' (a reflection of the growing professionalization of teaching and shifts in how education/teaching are viewed). Teacher Training College works is more likely to be used in reference to the past.
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    My question is for those who live in English-speaking countries, how are such universities (or faculties), are called in your country?
    I would have said "teachers' college" as a generic term, and Google shows that there are actually several in the US that are named Teachers College.

    I don't know why S1m0n kept going on and on about the types of degrees they award. Must not have had his morning coffee yet.... :D
     
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    Alex_Dispatch

    Member
    Russian
    They would have attended universities. Their degrees will either be, at a minimum, a Bachelor of Arts [or Sciences] with a diploma in education, or a Bachelor of Education with a specialisation in [subject area]. Or more likely a BA or BSc plus a Master of Arts in education, which is usually a five year program.
    Thank you!
     

    Alex_Dispatch

    Member
    Russian
    This sounds like a question about how to list in a cv the administrative unit in the university where you earned a degree.

    In the US, universities usually are made up of multiple colleges or schools.
    Boston University, for example, awards degrees at the Bachelor's, Master's, and doctoral level.
    CVs of graduates of programs there would list
    <degree abbreviation> in <department or program>, Wheelock College of Education and Human Development, Boston University.
    At Loyola University Chicago, the corresponding line in the cv would be
    <degree abbreviation> in <department or program>, School of Education, Loyola University Chicago.

    I suggest the same format for a degree outside the US: Broad degree level as it is called in your country (translated into English rather than into the American equivalent degree), department from which you received the degree, school within the university, and university.
    For example, Master of Arts in Educational Management, Faculty of Educational Studies, Lomonosov Moscow State University.

    If your university doesn't have all three levels -- department, school, university, -- then just include whatever it does have.
    Thank you, Roxxxannne, for the detailed explanation!
     

    Alex_Dispatch

    Member
    Russian
    In the UK and EU, they tend to be called things like University of Education, School of Education, Faculty of Education, Department of Education. It seems likely that one of these will be adequate for your purposes. Pedagogy is not used in the UK, but that does not mean it cannot be used in the Russian context.

    The phrase 'teacher training' is being replaced with 'teacher education' (a reflection of the growing professionalization of teaching and shifts in how education/teaching are viewed). Teacher Training College works is more likely to be used in reference to the past.
    Thank you, By-the-sea!
     
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