a prosperous 2016 / a prosperous 2016 year.

Ardy

Member
Iran-Farsi
Is it correct to start a formal email with this sentence:
Wish you a prosperous 2016 year OR 2016?

Thank you
 
  • elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    a prosperous 2016 :tick:
    a prosperous 2016 year :cross:

    In a formal e-mail, you would need to include the subject: I wish you...

    Whether or not prosperous is the best word to use depends on the context, the rest of the e-mail, your relationship with the recipient, etc.
     

    Ardy

    Member
    Iran-Farsi
    Thx friends for notes.
    Is there a diff in context which is formal but you don't know the recipient and the one which still is formal but you know the recipient!?
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    We just don't wish people prosperity very often, so the whole concept sounds a little foreign. Obsession over prosperity is more common for some other cultures, like Asian cultures. We would normally wish somebody a happy new year.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    We just don't wish people prosperity very often, so the whole concept sounds a little foreign. Obsession over prosperity is more common for some other cultures, like Asian cultures. We would normally wish somebody a happy new year.
    :thumbsup:

    My culture obsesses about health and happiness. We take prosperity for granted.
    We don't use abbreviations here. If native speakers used abbreviations of any sort, except the few agreed upon, we'd be xtlbl even to each other. That's my personal abbreviation for 'unintelligible'. :)
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    I mean that in our culture it is rare for us to say things like "May you have prosperity!" or "A prosperous new year to you!"
     
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