a quality person?

caireo

Senior Member
Tibetan
Hello,
I think it's correct to use:"a quality + thing", for example:"They offer the quality service." But I'm not sure if it's correct to use:"a qulaity + person", for example:"This school has a lot of quality teachers." Does it make sense to you?
Thank you.
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Hello Caireo. Yes, it certainly makes sense, and I'm 99.8% certain I've heard people use quality [adj.] + person.
    Now whether or not it's recommendable to use it in, for example, a formal essay, is an entirely different question ...
     

    cointi

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Can 'quality person' also mean a person who is loyal, helpful, honest, respectful, caring, courteous, etc.? In other words, a good person?
     

    DonnyB

    Member Emeritus
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Can 'quality person' also mean a person who is loyal, helpful, honest, respectful, caring, courteous, etc.? In other words, a good person?
    A "quality person" sounds a bit odd to me, and I wouldn't personally use it.

    However, I daresay that it might possibly be obvious from some suitable context that that's what it meant.
     

    cointi

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Thank you, DonnyB.

    How about this sentence? Is the context clear enough?

    When dating, most people ultimately want to find a quality person
    rather than just a pretty face.
     

    DonnyB

    Member Emeritus
    English UK Southern Standard English
    How about this sentence? Is the context clear enough?

    When dating, most people ultimately want to find a quality person
    rather than just a pretty face.
    I don't think I've ever seen "quality" used like that, although I'd agree that the meaning is fairly easy to deduce. I'd expect to see something like "genuine" in that context, but I daresay it might work for other people.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I believe I've seen it used that way in regards to people.

    They offer the quality service.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Quality person sounds odd to me too. I suspect the fault lies more in the noun person than the adjective quality, though. Quality service, quality teachers, quality meat, quality films, quality newspapers ~ all these sound (more or less) fine to me because it's fairly easy to quantify the quality of those things. Persons are such vague things, though ... especially ones that lack qualities:cool:
     

    djmc

    Senior Member
    English - United Kingdom
    In the eighteenth century one may have said "A lady of quality" meaning that she was of the gentry. I think this was an imitation of "une dame de qualité". Now one is more likely to say "it is a tennis racquet of quality". Both of these intend to praise the person or thing described. However if one thinks about it everything has its own quality which may be good, bad or indifferent. An object of no value whatsoever would still have its own quality.
     
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