A question about Turkish orthography - does 'thorn' ever appear?

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TimKR

New Member
UK
English-England
Merhaba

I watched a very interesting serious historical programme Ancient Invisible Cities on BBC4 here in UK last night about the history of Istanbul, reconstructing lost buildings using 3D scanning and virtual reality. I recommend it.

But my question is about a curious spelling I noted on screen. One of the experts interviewed was Ferudun Özgümüş, an apparently well known academic archaeologist in Istanbul.

On screen his name was spelled Özgümüþ with apparently the letter 'thorn' replacing the final ş. It is in the same uniform serif font - I took a screenshot to be sure I had really seen it. [Can I attach a file?] Thorn represents, in Old English and various Norse languages, the non-voiced th sound.

Is there any basis for using this letter in Turkish? Or is it perhaps some quirk of the software for putting titles on the screen? I should say this title was part of the original production, not any kind of subtitle generated in real time.

Teşekkür ederim
 
  • Rallino

    Moderatoúrkos
    Turkish
    It's just the software's failure in processing the Turkish diacritics. It used to be more common. But you can still find it every now and then. There are two more:

    ð = ğ
    ý = ı
     

    TimKR

    New Member
    UK
    English-England
    @Rallino Thanks very much. I rather suspected that. Interesting that it occurs for other letters too.
    Coding for multiple variant alphabets remains a difficult job I suppose!
     
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