a rare old coin to add to your collection

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wanabee

Senior Member
Japanese
Dear all,

I'm giving you a rare old coin that you should add to your coin collection.
I'm giving you a rare old coin that you can add to your coin collection.

I made up the sentences.
Can I rephrase those sentences like this?:
I'm giving you a rare old coin to add to your coin collection.

I would like to know how 'to add to your coin collection' modifies 'a rare old coin.'

I would appreciate any comments.
 
  • rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    It sounds OK to me. You can have an infinitive after a noun/pronoun. I gave the children some toys to play with. I bought some new clothes to take on holiday. This proposal's got nothing to recommend it.
     

    exgerman

    Senior Member
    NYC
    English but my first language was German
    The infinitive ("the infinitive of purpose") really goes with the verb give, not the noun coins. It tells you why I am giving you the coin.

    The sentence "I'm giving you a rare old coin to add to your coin collection" is a version of the fuller "I'm giving you a rare old coin in order to add it to your coin collection". It means "I'm giving you a rare old coin in order that you may add it to your coin collection."

    In your first two examples,that is a relative pronoun. In my re-write of your third sentence, that is a conjunction.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I'm giving you a rare old coin that you should add to your coin collection.
    I'm giving you a rare old coin that you can add to your coin collection.
    The second one sounds good to me. I wouldn't use the first one; it suggests that you are telling the person what he or she is obliged to ("should") do with your gift.

    Can I rephrase those sentences like this?:
    I'm giving you a rare old coin to add to your coin collection.
    Yes, that's fine, too.
     
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