A rather Strange sequence of words

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Wellbred

Senior Member
Persian
Our teacher sid something today in our lass tat sounded a bit strange to me,

"The statue did not come to The US as a whole. It was brought into the country in separate pieces. They raised funds to achieve enough money to put the parts together. Then they started assembling the statue of liberty"

What do you think guys?
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The first sentence by itself seems to me to say that the whole statue did not come to the US (parts of it were left behind or sent somewhere else). If the first sentence clearly said what was meant, then the second sentence would be purely redundant.
    "The statue was brought to the US in pieces."
    "To acheive money" is strange.
    "They raised enough funds to put the parts together."
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    This article will help: Statue of Liberty

    They raised funds to achieve enough money to put the parts together.:cross:
    They raised funds to achieve enough money to put the parts together. :tick:
    They raised enough funds to achieve money to put the parts together.:tick:
     

    Wellbred

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Thank you all for your contributions. I knew there was sth strange about the sentence. Something didn't add up.
    One of you said that in one case the second sentence would be redundant. My question is, what if he meant to say that the statue did not come to the US as a complete thing.

    Could have he said, for example, that 'the statue did not come to the US as a complete thing but it came in pieces and by raising enough funds people managed to put the parts together'
     
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    Wellbred

    Senior Member
    Persian
    And another question is, how come we can say "to achieve or gain independence" but regarding money we can only use gain and achieve would sound strange?
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    To gain = to attain, to come into possession of [something]
    To achieve = to bring to a successful end; to carry through; to accomplish [something] This does not work with 'money'.
     

    Wellbred

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Now that makes sense! Thanks man.
    Would you be so kind to answer my former question too. Thanks a million.
     
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    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    The reason that the second sentence is redundant is that, as written, it basically says "They raised enough money to have raised enough money to put the parts together." PaulQ is completely right to chop off one of its redundant halves.

    Also, wellbred, weight is something else that you can gain but you can't achieve, unfortunately.

    In terms of "The statue did not come as a whole," well, I don't mind it that much. I agree that the more idiomatic and English-sounding way to express that thought would be "The statue was shipped in pieces."
     

    Wellbred

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Could have he said, for example, that 'the statue did not come to the US as a complete thing but it came in pieces and by raising enough funds people managed to put the parts together'
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I would prefer: 'the statue did not come to the US as a complete thing but it came in pieces and, by raising enough funds, people managed to have the parts put together/assembled.'

    Yes, he could have said that, and perhaps he should have. With those small amendments, it is clear and exactly what happened.
     
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