a reciting tone, two passing tones, a semicadence

tsoapm

Senior Member
🇬🇧 English (England)
Hi,

I’m hoping someone with better musical theory knowledge than me can help me with this. I’m going to talk with my choir’s maestro about pointing a gospel acclamation for Anglican chant, and I think some good terminology may help. So:
In simplest terms, Anglican Single Chant consists of:

1) a reciting tone
2) two passing tones
3) a semicadence
4) a reciting tone
5) four passing tones
6) a cadence.
Link. Maybe some examples would clarify things, for proper musicians:

Capture.PNG

I think this would translate to:

1) un tenor
2) due note di passaggio
3) una cadenza imperfetta
4) un tenor
5) quattro note di passaggio
6) una cadenza autentica

but the part about cadences is beyond my pay grade. I think in context it may just mean 3) a V chord and d) a I chord? Could they be cadenze imperfetta and autentica respectively? The whole meaning of cadence, as far as I can make out, means the harmonic transition, so I’m not sure I’ve even understood the original, actually.

Thanks

Edit: perhaps what I want is dominante and cadenza.
 
Last edited:
  • italtrav

    Senior Member
    English
    Hi,

    I’m hoping someone with better musical theory knowledge than me can help me with this. I’m going to talk with my choir’s maestro about pointing a gospel acclamation for Anglican chant, and I think some good terminology may help. So:Link. Maybe some examples would clarify things, for proper musicians:

    View attachment 24358

    I think this would translate to:

    1) un tenor
    2) due note di passaggio
    3) una cadenza imperfetta
    4) un tenor
    5) quattro note di passaggio
    6) una cadenza autentica

    but the part about cadences is beyond my pay grade. I think in context it may just mean 3) a V chord and d) a I chord? Could they be cadenze imperfetta and autentica respectively? The whole meaning of cadence, as far as I can make out, means the harmonic transition, so I’m not sure I’ve even understood the original, actually.

    Thanks

    Edit: perhaps what I want is dominante and cadenza.
    Most of what you need on cadences is here: Cadenza - Wikipedia. An imperfect cadence is the usual V-I, but one or both of the chords in inverted, supposedly gentling the effect.
     

    tsoapm

    Senior Member
    🇬🇧 English (England)
    Thank you: yes, I more or less understood that, which is why I changed my mind about my cadenza imperfetta. Maybe I should attempt to analyse the chords in my examples to see what harmonic function they have.
     
    One problem is that "semicadenza" / "cadenza sospesa" and "cadenza imperfetta" seem to differ technically. See Appunti di teoria ed armonia musicale – parte 17
    If after your analysis you find that the mediant cadences in the different examples of Anglican Single Chant fall into different categories, it might be better to refer to 3) as "una cadenza mediana" and 6) as "una cadenza finale".
    In most, if not all, cases, I suspect that the "cadenza finale" will be "una cadenza autentica / perfetta".
     
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