a refuge or sanctuary need to be connected and have spirit?

longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi
Here are some words from Lady Chatterley's Lover(para.3):
"But it was not really a refuge, a sanctuary, because she had no connection with it. It was only a place where she could get away from the rest. She never really touched the spirit of the wood itself. . .if it had any such nonsensical thing."


What did Lawrence mean by "had no connection with it" and "She never really touched the spirit of the wood itself"? I think any safe place is fit to be a refuge or a sanctuary, and that people don't need to have connection with the place, nor should the place have spirit.

Could you give me an explanation please? Thank you in advance
 
  • longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    This is not a language question, long.
    Oh, thank you all the same. But I think it's still a language quesion.
    sanctuary: sacred place, eg a church, temple or mosque, where sb is protected from people wishing to arrest or attack him(by Oxford dictionary).
    I think church, temple or mosque is a place where people can get spiritual comfort. In other words, people can touch the spirit of the sanctuary.

    And connection is like to refer to:eveything about daily life in a refuge or a sanctuary.



    Am I right?

     
    I think the question fits the overrall mission of the forums, to discuss word usage, in this case 'sanctuary' and 'spirit' as applied to woods. My private opinion as a nonmoderator.

    Lawrence is saying the place could have been like a sanctuary, a sacred place of refuge, but it wasn't, since Connie, there, did not make contact with the 'spirit,' some intangible essence of the wood.

    Check dictionary for extended senses of sanctuary--innermost sacred place in a church; safe place of refuge; place where one is protected, etc.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi
    Here are some words from Lady Chatterley's Lover(para.3):
    "But it was not really a refuge, a sanctuary, because she had no connection with it. It was only a place where she could get away from the rest. She never really touched the spirit of the wood itself. . .if it had any such nonsensical thing."


    What did Lawrence mean by "had no connection with it" and "She never really touched the spirit of the wood itself"? I think any safe place is fit to be a refuge or a sanctuary, and that people don't need to have connection with the place, nor should the place have spirit.

    Could you give me an explanation please? Thank you in advance
    Hello Lonxianchen.

    I think you make a very reasonable point. Many people would understand refuge or sanctuary in the way you suggest in your post #3.

    Lawrence, however, here clearly is defining by implication what he means by the words, and saying that they suggest for him a spiritual home, somewhere you can come for solace and comfort, because you identify with the numinous quality of the place itself.

    I agree with you that Lawrence is using the word in quite a specialist way, but he came from a coal-mining family from the North Midlands in England, and may have had special feelings about green places and such things as woods.
     
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