A regard for the requester would often make one readily yield to a request . . . .

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shiness

Senior Member
Korean, South Korea.
``You appear to me, Mr. Darcy, to allow nothing for the influence of friendship and affection. A regard for the requester would often make one readily yield to a request without waiting for arguments to reason one into it. -Quote from Jane Austen's novel-



Hey.

I'd like to know what the requester in the quote implies, is it the person who is asking for something? or the one receiving a demand from his fellow? I will provide you with more context in the novel if neccesary.

Thanks.
 
  • ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    Hello shiness,

    The "requester' is always the one who is requesting, asking for something. The meaning here is that if e.g. Mr Darcy asked Mr Bingley for something, the fact that Mr Bingley held Mr Darcy in such high regard would be enough reason for Mr Bingley to do what Mr Darcy asked without waiting for Mr Darcy to explain the reasons why he asked for that particular thing.

    If I remember correctly, a little bit before or after that excerpt they actually use a "real" example where they discuss what Mr Bingley would do if asked not to leave on a trip. If Mr Darcy asked him not to leave it would be perfectly OK for Mr Bingley to do what Mr Darcy asked (yield to the request) without knowing why Mr Darcy asked since the requester (Mr Darcy) is a friend of Mr Bingley (well that's how Elisabeth sees it)
     
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