A restroom is a room...to rest in and recover.

Karen123456

Senior Member
Malaysia English
Accordingly to Oxford dictionaries, in British English, a restroom is a room in a public building for people to relax or recover in.

Do British native speakers subscribe to the above definition? Thanks.
 
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  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    What makes you think we wouldn't, Karen?

    If I used the term "restroom" in a UK context (as opposed to a US context), then that's what I'd mean - though in practice I'd probably use a different term.

    There's some discussion in this previous thread: Can "rest room" have another meaning than "toilets"?

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    cross-posted with Langton's Aunt
     

    Karen123456

    Senior Member
    Malaysia English
    What makes you think we wouldn't, Karen? I didn't. I asked in my first post: Do British native speakers subscribe to the above definition?

    If I used the term "restroom" in a UK context (as opposed to a US context), then that's what I'd mean - though in practice I'd probably use a different term.

    There's some discussion in this previous thread: Can "rest room" have another meaning than "toilets"?

    --------

    cross-posted with Langton's Aunt
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    British native speakers subscribe to the above definition?
    I do. When I was young, I was puzzled by American references to restrooms having toilets in them - I imagined a room with low tables and people in armchairs sitting about whilst people went to the toilet.
     

    Karen123456

    Senior Member
    Malaysia English
    Thanks, Paul.

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    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    I've noticed that in her latest novel "The Casual Vacancy", J.K. Rowling uses the term bathroom throughout with the meaning of lavatory, even though the entire story is set in England. (This is just about the only memorable feature of the novel, by the way.) Both this and the use of restroom strike me as totally out of place - they could only be used by someone with no ear for British English, or else so obsessed with selling to an American audience that they distort their native tongue in advance.

    Let's get it straight: in British English a restroom is a room where people take a rest, and a bathroom is one where they take a bath. I know this may sound quite ridiculous, but there you go... :rolleyes:
     

    Karen123456

    Senior Member
    Malaysia English
    Thanks to all of you.

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    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Yes. I agree. Oxford Dictionaries are supposed to be a reference for many sorts of English but away from British and American English, they usually only contain occasional words of Australian English with perhaps some commoner South African and Indian English.
     

    Karen123456

    Senior Member
    Malaysia English
    Thanks, Paul.

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