a roll of thunder

jacdac

Senior Member
Lebanese
As Scott entered the ninth kilometer, a long peal of thunder rolled across the sky, west to east.
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There was another roll of thunder.
Source: Elevation by Stephen King
Context: It is is late autumn in Casle Rock. Scott is running a 12k Turkey Trot.

Is it right to assume that collocations a) b) and c) are found in books and not used in common conversation while d) is?

a) a rumble/roll of thunder (=one of a series of deep sounds): We could hear the rumble of thunder growing louder.
b) a clap/crash/crack of thunder (=one extremely loud sound): Lightning flickered across the sky, followed seconds later by a loud crack of thunder.
c) a peal of thunder (=one very loud sound): She jumped as a huge peal of thunder crashed directly overhead.
d) thunder and lightning: Rain fell steadily for an hour, accompanied by thunder and lightning.

Thank you.
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    As always, it depends on context.

    I might say, for instance: "We had a lot of thunder last night. It was rumbling in the distance for a while, and then suddenly there was a huge clap overhead that made the cat run behind the sofa."
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    In conversation, I might say "a clap of thunder", and I would certainly say "thunder and lightning".

    I probably wouldn't, though, say "a peal of thunder" or "a roll of thunder".
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    a) a rumble/roll/peal of thunder (=The deep sounds that continue at varying and deep pitches): We could hear the rumble of thunder growing louder.
    b) a clap/crash/crack of thunder (=one extremely loud sound): Lightning flickered across the sky, followed seconds later by a loud crack of thunder.
    c) a peal of thunder (as a) above) also a solitary crack of thunder but usually prolonged. She jumped as a huge peal of thunder crashed directly overhead. Peal differs from rumble and roll as it is more common than them in the plural to indicate continual (not continuous) instances of thunder.
    d) thunder and lightning: Rain fell steadily for an hour, accompanied by thunder and lightning.
     
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