a route of a place

popup

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello,

When we search the correct way to a place from the Internet, do we say "search a route of a place", or "search a place route", or neither is idiomatic?

For example, is it idiomatic to say the following sentence?
Tom thinks that the computer in the dorm lobby is very helpful because he often realizes that he needs to search a route of a place when going dowstairs from his room. With the computer in the lobby, he doesn't have to go back to his room to search the information.

BTW, I often see "go downstairs", but can I say "go downstairs from a room", as I used in the above example? Thank you very much for your help!
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    No, we don't say "search a route of a place" or "search a place route." If you mean that the person is using the Internet to figure out how to get from Point A to Point B, we would probably say "He's searching for a route to B from A," or "He's trying to figure out how to get from A to B."

    You'll need to start a new thread with your question about going downstairs.
     

    popup

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    No, we don't say "search a route of a place" or "search a place route." If you mean that the person is using the Internet to figure out how to get from Point A to Point B, we would probably say "He's searching for a route to B from A," or "He's trying to figure out how to get from A to B."

    You'll need to start a new thread with your question about going downstairs.
    Hi Florentia, thanks a lot for your comments! Yeah, what I mean is that Tom needs to use the Internet to figure out how to get to a place. So I just say "he needs to search for a route to a place"? And can I say ""he needs to search for a direction to a place" to express the same meaning?

    I will start a new thread for "going downstairs". Thank you for your suggestion :p
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    "He needs to search for a route to X" is fine.

    "A direction" refers to north, east, southwest, etc. "Directions" means "Turn right on Carter Street, then go three blocks…" "He needs to search for directions to X."
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    Also:

    I need to find the best route from A to B.

    or:

    Google Maps will give me the best route from A to B.
     

    popup

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Hi Florentia, Bennnymix and Linkway,

    Thank you very much for your useful comments! It's very clear.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I don't think I would use "route" at all, but perhaps that's just me.

    He uses the computer to find out how to get from Central to Yuen Long.
    He uses the computer to find out how to get from his home to the Natural History Museum.
    He uses the computer to find out how to get from Monaco to Nice.
     

    popup

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Hi Copyright, thanks for your comments!

    If I say "find out how to get to a place", will people understand it as the way by car or by bus? Please allow me to provide more contexts:

    Eg: The school is going to install some computers in the student dorm lobby. Tom thinks the plan is great. Sometimes he realizes he needs to check an email or search for a route to a place after going downstairs from his room. If there are computers in the dorm lobby, he won’t have to go back to his room to get such information.

    Can I just replace the bold part with "find out how to get to a place"? I admit the sentences I drafted above are clumsy. But I just can't find a better way to express it clearly. Sigh as a non-native speaker... Do the sentences sound idiomatic to native speakers?
     
    Last edited:

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    "Search for a route to (a place)" or "Find/Figure out how to get to (a place)" mean the same thing. In both cases, we have no idea how you're going to get there: on foot, or by car, train, boat, plane, etc.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    While I might not use "route" here just because of the way I speak, I don't think most people, including myself, would find "route" technical here.
     
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