A rush brings the bad result.

jokaec

Senior Member
Chinese - Hong Kong
A slow fire makes sweet malt. A rush brings the bad result. For example, if you rush to finish a project without a good plan, normally the result won't be satisfied.

I made up the second sentence. Is my sentence idiomatic? If not, can you suggest a better expression? Thank you.
 
  • SwissPete

    Senior Member
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    For example, if you rush to finish a project without a good plan, the result may not be satisfying/satisfactory.
     

    snargleplax

    Senior Member
    English - Northwestern United States
    "A rush brings the bad result" is grammatically correct but comes off awkward. I think the biggest issue is the use of the definite article "the" rather than "a" -- this would make sense if there were context to imply we're talking about a specific bad result, rather than just bad results generally. If we change it to "a," we have:

    A rush brings a bad result.

    This is fine as far as it goes, but it has a less-than-idiomatic feel that I think just comes down to word choice. The gerund "rushing" might work a little better than "a rush," but again only so much.

    There are existing idioms in English that cover this ground -- "haste makes waste" springs to mind.
     

    jokaec

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Hong Kong
    "A rush brings the bad result" is grammatically correct but comes off awkward. I think the biggest issue is the use of the definite article "the" rather than "a" -- this would make sense if there were context to imply we're talking about a specific bad result, rather than just bad results generally. If we change it to "a," we have:

    A rush brings a bad result.

    This is fine as far as it goes, but it has a less-than-idiomatic feel that I think just comes down to word choice. The gerund "rushing" might work a little better than "a rush," but again only so much.

    There are existing idioms in English that cover this ground -- "haste makes waste" springs to mind.
    Thank you very much, snargleplax and swisspete.
     

    jokaec

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Hong Kong
    Thank you very much, snargleplax and swisspete.
    Is the saying "the slow fire makes sweet malt" common when someone is rushing you to finish something but you want to use this saying to convince him to give you more time?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I don't know where "a slow fire makes sweet malt" came from (I'd never heard it before), but I rather like it. :)

    However, your attempts at a paraphrase are far from idiomatic. "A rush brings the bad result" is absolutely not something a native English-speaker would be likely to say. There are, of course, already idiomatic phrases expressing this sort of thing. For example (though I'm sure there are others):

    More haste, less speed (The more you hurry, the less efficient you become, so it's counterproductive timewise)
     
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