a salutory technique used by <the><an> Inuit

JJXR

Senior Member
Russian
Hello to all,

Thanks for reading my post.


Source:

A brief history of snow

Sample sentences:

1. The early 20th-century Arctic explorer Vilhjalmur Stefansson relates a salutory technique used by the Inuit to deal with a blizzard, a common phenomenon in the Canadian north. When an Inuit becomes lost, he will make himself comfortable and conserve energy, perhaps building an igloo, perhaps sitting with his back to the wind, moving around only occasionally to keep himself from freezing, sleeping if possible.

2. The early 20th-century Arctic explorer Vilhjalmur Stefansson relates a salutory technique used by the Inuit to deal with a blizzard, a common phenomenon in the Canadian north. When the Inuit becomes lost, he will make himself comfortable and conserve energy, perhaps building an igloo, perhaps sitting with his back to the wind, moving around only occasionally to keep himself from freezing, sleeping if possible.

3. The early 20th-century Arctic explorer Vilhjalmur Stefansson relates a salutory technique used by an Inuit to deal with a blizzard, a common phenomenon in the Canadian north. When the Inuit becomes lost, he will make himself comfortable and conserve energy, perhaps building an igloo, perhaps sitting with his back to the wind, moving around only occasionally to keep himself from freezing, sleeping if possible.

4. The early 20th-century Arctic explorer Vilhjalmur Stefansson relates a salutory technique used by an Inuit to deal with a blizzard, a common phenomenon in the Canadian north. When an Inuit becomes lost, he will make himself comfortable and conserve energy, perhaps building an igloo, perhaps sitting with his back to the wind, moving around only occasionally to keep himself from freezing, sleeping if possible.

Question:

Sentence #1 is the original. I wonder if the combinations of bolded articles used in the other three versions are possible.


Thanks a lot for any comments, corrections or suggestions!

Regards,
JJXR
 
  • grassy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I'd say 'the Inuit' means 'the Inuit people'. The indefinite article would sound a little bit odd because we're talking about the customs of a particular group of people, not one single individual.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    (2) is confusing because the first mention of Inuit refers to the people and the second to an individual.

    (3) is fine, but the first mention is of an individual. The second mention is of the same individual. This, of course, does not mean the same as (1), but it is correct English.

    (4) is puzzling. Both mentions are of individuals, but the second individual does not appear to be the same as the first. Why not?
     
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