A school of fish wait/waits

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MrRise

Senior Member
Russian
Hello, I'm watching a film 'Bridge to Terabithia', and now I see, to me, it's an incorrect form of a verb, could you explain why it's written this way?

It's a little essay written by Leslie Burke, she wrote: " I'm going deeper past the wrinkled rocks and dark seaweed toward a deep blueness where a school of silver fish wait."

This is how I think: A school, whatever of, it's a singular form, and this is present tense, thus - it must be A school of silver fish waits? But nope, we have just wait, and I have no idea why...

Even my expansion Grammarly says it's a collective noun, which requires waits, not wait.

It's said about her essay that it's well written, used a lot of adjectives, so, it really couldn't be a grammatical mistake? Or it could?

Thank you a lot for your help! :)
 
  • MrRise

    Senior Member
    Russian
    It appears that she regards 'a school of silver fish' as plural.
    Is that a mistake? Or everyone can interpret it as they want and that wouldn't be a mistake?

    If I say: a pack of dogs watch people passing by. And, then I say: a pack of dogs watches people passing by.

    Are they both right? Or only second one?
     
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