a sea of opportunities

ThomasK

Senior Member
Belgium, Dutch
In Dutch we have een zee aan (a sea of) possibilities/ opportunities. Do you have a similar 'watery' expression referring to some kind of some kind of plenitude?

I had thought of carpooling as using the plenitude/ mass/ great quantity of cars already driving on the road, or so I'd explain it (corrections welcome of course), but that turned out to be wrong: pool here refers to poule in French, so I noticed. But OK, how about 'watery' words for this plenitude?
 
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  • AndrasBP

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    In Hungarian, "a sea of opportunities" is a common collocation:

    tengernyi lehetőség

    tenger = sea
    -nyi = quantitative suffix
    lehetőség = opportunity, possibility
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    We can view the topic a little broader too… I have been wondering about about waves (a wave of, een golf aan), and guess it is an example indeed. I quote Wikipedia: A wave of shoppers stampeded through the door... "A wave" here is "a sudden unusual amount of". So again some water phenomenon offering plenty of things, though not always the best...
     
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    Perseas

    Senior Member
    Greek
    In Dutch we have een zee aan (a sea of) possibilities/ opportunities. Do you have a similar 'watery' expression referring to some kind of some kind of plenitude?
    Greek:
    μια θάλασσα από Χ -- a sea of X
    [mɲa 'θalasa a'po]

    Although this expression is not so widespread in my opinion, it exists.
    H Aθήνα φαινόταν τη νύχτα από το αεροπλάνο σαν μια θάλασσα από φώτα.
    Athens seemed at night from the plane like a sea of lights.
    Entry no 5.
     
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    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    Czech:

    moře + gen. plur. (= a sea of ...s) in the sense 'plenty of' is relatively common, although it sounds somewhat expressive:

    Mám moře času. = I have plenty of time (a sea of time).
    Nadělal moře chyb. = He made a lot of mistakes (a sea of mistakes).
    Mám moře práce. = I am very busy (I have a sea of work).
    K tomu je třeba moře odvahy. = It takes a lot of courage (a sea of courage).
    This would be an interesting combination:
    V moři je moře ryb. :) = Fish is plentiful in the sea (in the sea there is a sea of fish).

    vlna něčeho = a wave of sth (the term wave was already generalized in physics: a manifestation of an energy pervading a medium or space).

    In the sense 'a sudden unusual amount of', we use the noun vlna, often in connection with the verb zaplaviti (= to flood, to inundate):

    vlna
    veder udeřila ...
    = a wave of heat (a wave of sultry weather) hit ...;
    Její mysl zaplavila vlna radosti. = A wave of joy has flooded her mind.
    Město zaplavila vlna zločinnosti. = The city was (has been) flooded with a crime vawe.
     
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    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Interesting expressions. As far as I can see though, seas are not that dangerous with us… ;-)

    Czech:
    Mám moře času. = I have plenty of time (a sea of time) [een zee van tijd, yes!]

    This would be an interesting combination:
    V moři je moře ryb. :) = Fish is plentiful in the sea (in the sea there is a sea of fish).
    [There must be an expression in Dutch, but I cannot find it right now; but: isn't the fish not the most important aspect of the expression, whereas we mainly focus on the wealth offered by the sea in "a sea of"?]

    vlna něčeho = a wave of sth (the term wave was already generalized in physics: a manifestation of an energy pervading a medium or space).
    We do not think of the floods and the drowning in Dutch, I think, but that might be the reason why waves can be dangerous indeed...

    In the sense 'a sudden unusual amount of', we use vlna often in connection with the verb zaplaviti (= to flood, to inundate):

    vlna
    veder
    = a wave of heat (of sultry weather);
    Její mysl zaplavila vlna radosti. = A wave of joy has flooded her mind.
    Město zaplavila vlna zločinnosti. = The city was (has been) flooded with a crime vawe.
     

    Perseas

    Senior Member
    Greek
    How about waves in Greek, Apmoy?
    I am not Apmoy, but I could also write something :)

    "Κύμα" ['cima] (=wave) is used figuratively also in Greek to denote "a sudden unusual amount of". Specifically:

    -For feelings that swell and overwhelm the soul like a wave: Ένιωσε ένα κύμα οργής (He felt a flash of anger)
    -For natural phenomena of high intensity and of limited duration: Κύμα καύσωνα/ψύχους (Heat/Cold wave)
    -For a social or moral phenomenon, usually negative, which occurs to a large extent: Κύμα βίας (Wave of violence)
    -For group (and in segments) movements of people:Έφτασαν τα πρώτα κύματα των τουριστών (The first waves of tourists arrived).
     
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    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    In French, to express this meaning, we use "un océan de ...." (an ocean of...) but not "une mer de..." (a sea of...)
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    "A world of opportunities" in English

    With sea
    "A sea of knowledge"
    "A sea of words"
    "A sea of blue, red, white, green"
    "A sea of people"
     
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    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    INteresting variations in French (the ocean is too far for us, I suppose) and English (had not thought of that variation...).

    "Κύμα" ['cima] (=wave) is used figuratively also in Greek to denote "a sudden unusual amount of".
    So maybe we could conclude that Greek prefers waves as a metaphor for plenitude, mass, ..., not really sea or something the like...
     

    Perseas

    Senior Member
    Greek
    So maybe we could conclude that Greek prefers waves as a metaphor for plenitude, mass, ..., not really sea or something the like...
    I would say, yes. Although there can be used sometimes other elements as well, such as "ωκεανός" (ocean), "χείμαρρος" (torrent, stream), "τσουνάμι" (tsunami). The last two linked with intensity.
     

    Perseas

    Senior Member
    Greek
    Is "tsunami" a recently introduced expression?
    I believe, yes. Eg. "τσουνάμι εξελίξεων" ("tsunami of developments"), "τσουνάμι αποκαλύψεων" ("tsunami of revelations").

    "Turistaáradat" and "emberáradat" are two common Hungarian compounds, literally "a flood of tourists" and "a flood of people".
    In Greek:
    "Κοσμοπλημμύρα" [kozmopli'mira]
    Κόσμος=people
    Πλημμύρα=flood.
     

    Armas

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    In Finnish it's usually a compound word and there are only some words that are commonly used, like kukkameri (a sea of flowers), ihmismeri (a sea of people), valomeri (a sea of lights) and a few others. Tulva (flood) and aalto (wave) are also used like in many languages already described above.
     
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