A senior moment

moodywop

Banned
Italian - Italy
The other day, when I couldn't remember a name, an English friend said something like you must be having/you're having a senior moment. I guess it's a jocular reference to becoming forgetful with age.

Is it a pretty recent phrase and is it used in both AE and BE? I had never heard it before.
 
  • Bil

    Banned
    English USA
    Hi moodywop

    It's a very common expression in the USA and has been around for a couple of decades. And, yes, you guessed right about its meaning.
     

    A90Six

    Senior Member
    England - English.
    moodywop said:
    The other day, when I couldn't remember a name, an English friend said something like you must be having/you're having a senior moment. I guess it's a jocular reference to becoming forgetful with age.

    Is it a pretty recent phrase and is it used in both AE and BE? I had never heard it before.
    In the UK I have not heard it, but that does not mean it isn't here - I don't move in those circles quite yet.

    I presume it is jocular and a variation of the line, "you must be having a blonde moment" - a moment of stupidity or forgetfulness thought to be common amongst blondes, be they bottle or natural.
     

    moodywop

    Banned
    Italian - Italy
    Thanks Bil

    It just occurred to me - can one also have a junior moment?:)
    And if so, would it suggest one is being juvenile or childish?

    EDIT: many thanks to A90six, too.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    It's very common in my part of the world too, though just for the moment I can't remember where I heard it last.
    It is used to explain those inexplicable occurrences, like the yoghurt in the medicine cabinet and the liniment in the fridge.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I think a senior moment, or benign senescent memory impairment, is usually something more than a moment of forgetfulness. A true senior moment has to include some element of the completely ludicrous. Here's a fictional example.

    Those of you who have the pleasure of access to BBC Radio 2 and listen to Terry Wogan in the morning will be very familiar with the concept:D

    (The OED lists the first sighting as 1996)
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Moodywop said:
    It just occurred to me - can one also have a junior moment?:)
    And if so, would it suggest one is being juvenile or childish?
    That's a nice thought. I've not heard of it, although it could certainly come in handy.

    For those of us who have not quite reached senior moment status, we simply have brain f*rts. There's a more delicate way of expressing this (using brain _______), but for some reason, it's slipped my mind at present. (brain fluff, brain cloud, brain drain?????)

    I have also heard people say "I have half-timers," I only forget half of the time. Of course, this is a reference to alzheimers disease (all-timers), so some people may be sensitive about the joke.
     

    moodywop

    Banned
    Italian - Italy
    GenJen54 said:
    I've not heard of it, although it could certainly come in handy.
    Hi GenJen

    I googled "junior moment" and I found quite a few examples. This one cheered me up:) :

    Just to make you feel better, I have heard that if you are under the age of 75 what you had is called a "Junior Moment " not a "Senior Moment"

    It seems that this "I'm having/I had a/an X moment" phrase is quite flexible. A while back FFB mentioned "an antsy moment". And I found several examples of "an Alice in Wonderland moment", often with reference to President Bush:)
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    Yes, having a _____ moment has become a rather general construct for describing a momentary lapse of mental acuity similar to those stereotypically ascribed to whatever _____ is.

    The blank be almost anything, including a persons name or a place. It's a fun construct, so the point is to find something creative for the comparison.
     
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