a sense of rage

nagomi

Senior Member
Korean
"We can't ask people to engage in civility here because that just means lower your voice, don't be emotional. This is an incredibly emotional topic. People feel loss. They feel anger. They feel a sense of rage. This has been coming for generations. And I think he needs to be prepared for a very hard-nosed, tough emotional conversation that's coming his way."

I see the speaker said "a sense of rage" not just "rage". What's the effect one can expect from using "a sense" not just name of an emotion itself?

source: Barbershop: Virginia Gov. Northam Plans His 'Racial Reconciliation Tour'
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Saying "They feel rage" would mean they're actually angry at that point, and showing it.

    "They feel a sense of rage" means the rage is lurking below the surface; those people don't display it all the time but it's there in them. Does that make sense?
     

    nagomi

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Saying "They feel rage" would mean they're actually angry at that point, and showing it.

    "They feel a sense of rage" means the rage is lurking below the surface; those people don't display it all the time but it's there in them. Does that make sense?
    I still feel distant, but yes it's better now. Thank you. Can I replace "a sense" here with "a hint"?
     

    bennymix

    Senior Member
    'hint' is not so good. We do say, "The pudding had a hint of vanilla." :tick:
    "He felt a hint of rage" is odd.:confused:

    I somewhat disagree that 'sense of' implies sporadically displayed.

    I think the terms are almost the same. "He felt despair" "He felt a sense of despair"

    Similarly: "He felt unhappy." "He felt a sense of unhappiness."
     
    Last edited:

    nagomi

    Senior Member
    Korean
    'hint' is not so good. We do say, "The pudding had a hint of vanilla." :tick:
    "He felt a hint of rage" is odd.:confused:

    I somewhat disagree that 'sense of' implies sporadically displayed.

    I think the terms are almost the same. "He felt despair" "He felt a sense of despair"

    Similarly: "He felt unhappy." "He felt a sense of unhappiness."
    Having said that, it there a difference from "a feeling of" or they are the same?
     
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