A sentence structure: ... rankled in

Yichen

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello everyone,

I feel the structure is somewhat complicated:
1. I can deduce from "whom" that the part is a sentence "in whom the family tradition of past glories, lost forever, rankled in unspoken hate and crackled out in bitter humor. "
2. "lost" is used as an intransitive verb.
3. what about "rankled"? Is it a past participle or a verb (past form of rankle)?
If it is a verb, should it be "and rankled..."?

His tall brothers were a grim, quiet lot, in whom the family tradition of past glories, lost forever, rankled in unspoken hate and crackled out in bitter humor. (from Gone with the wind)


Many thanks.
 
  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    His tall brothers were a grim, quiet lot, in whom the family tradition of past glories, lost forever, rankled in unspoken hate and crackled out in bitter humor.

    The lost forever is parenthetical/in apposition so there is no need for the "and" : The "tradition of past glories ... rankled in ..."
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hello everyone,
    Hello, Yichen.

    I feel the structure is somewhat complicated:
    1. I can deduce from "whom" that the part is a sentence "in whom the family tradition of past glories, lost forever, rankled in unspoken hate and crackled out in bitter humor. "
    2. "lost" is used as an intransitive verb.
    I see "lost" as a mere participle that functions as an adjective.
    3. what about "rankled"? Is it a past participle or a verb (past form of rankle)?
    "Rankled" here is definitely being used as a verb in the past tense.
    If it is a verb, should it be "and rankled..."?
    If you view "lost forever" as a parenthetical statement and mentally omit it, you'll see that "rankled" fits next to the noun phrase "the family tradition of past glories". The predicate "rankled in unspoken hate and crackled out in bitter humor" does not need the conjunction "and" to connect it to the subject "the family tradition of past glories." Does that make sense to you?

    His tall brothers were a grim, quiet lot, in whom the family tradition of past glories, lost forever, rankled in unspoken hate and crackled out in bitter humor. (from Gone with the wind)
    Cross-posting with Mr. Stuart. :)
     
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