a series or a sequence of cards ?

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Hela

Senior Member
Tunisia - French
Hello again,

When you play cards and have in your hand an ace, a king, a ???, a queen, do you call a series or a sequence of cards ?

eg: My cards make/form a sequence/series ?

Thank you for your help
 
  • MOT39

    Member
    France-Canadian English
    Hello
    I'd say neither. In poker (five cards) it's called a "straight" and if all the cards are the same suit: a "straight flush". "I have a straight (10,J,Q,K,A), ace high." I'd use "run" otherwise. Queen, king, ace: three card run.
     

    rainbow84uk

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    I'd use 'run' too (mainly because I know next to nothing about poker!)

    By the way, the picture card between a 10 and a queen is called a 'jack', I don't know if that's what you were asking for with the '???' but thought I'd throw it in!

    Lauren x
     

    Hela

    Senior Member
    Tunisia - French
    Indeed, rainbow, that's the word I was looking for "jack"! :)
    Since I know nothing about poker either, I'll opt for "run" too.

    However, would you please give me a sentence to see how it can properly be used ?
    Thanks to both of you :thumbsup:
     

    MOT39

    Member
    France-Canadian English
    Considering your text is about poker you should keep "straight". A straight is 5 cards and no less in "normal" poker. I gave you an example above using a straight with ace high. Imagine you have: the 6 7 8 9 and 10. You'd say "(I have a) straight 10 high." Other expressions (while I'm on the subject): a pair, three of a kind, two pairs, a flush, a straight, a full house, four of a kind, a straight flush and a royal flush.
     

    Hela

    Senior Member
    Tunisia - French
    Good evening, Mot

    a full house = 4 aces ?
    So the word "sequence" is not used in the jargon of card players (other than poker players) ?

    Can you say "my cards do not form a run" or something of the kind?

    Best regards
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Considering your text is about poker you should keep "straight".
    Unless it's been changed, Hela's text doesn't mention poker.

    Hela, a "run" is any series of cards in sequence. It depends on the game you're playing as to how many cards you need in sequence to win a hand or a trick (or whatever). However, any sequential group of cards is called a "run" in all card games.

    And if you don't have a run, you would say "I don't have a run" or "I don't have any runs" (again, it depends on the game).

    And, no, a "full house" is not four aces. If you Google "how to play poker" (or some such), you will find the explanations.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Around here, a number of cards in sequence is known, generally, as a sequence or a run.

    It would only be called a straight if there were five cards, not four, and if we were talking about poker.

    <<Mod note: supporting Dimcl's point - please keep this thread to the topic in post #1. There is no suggestion that this question relates to poker. >>
     

    MOT39

    Member
    France-Canadian English
    Hi Dimcl
    Long time no see. Hela has two threads going on cards so I assumed his reference to poker covered both. The other one is "jumble".
     

    Hela

    Senior Member
    Tunisia - French
    I started 2 threads on the subject because Panj is never happy when I ask 2 questions in the same thread ;)
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    And there, once again, is an excellent example of the difficulty caused by failure to provide context.

    In any case, four cards in a sequence is not a straight, is it?
     

    MOT39

    Member
    France-Canadian English
    Haven't managed to get my hands (gone into hiding) on my Hoyle's book of cardgame rules, so I'm going from memory. Some people play poker for pennies (dimes with inflation) and can change the rules before each deal thus calling a "four card straight" as being valid for that hand. But "run(s)" is/are the common term. In cribbage "three or four in a row" give a point per card in the run. Hope this helps.
     
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