a serious enough problem to <justify> any measure

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Evamiao

New Member
Chinese
There is an inevitable degree of waste in the system, and fraud is generally not a serious enough problem to justify any measure that would cost significant time or money.
1.In this sentence, what does "justify any measure" mean? Does this mean there is no need to justify fraud by using any measure?
2."justify any measure" is this correct? or should say "justify by using any measure..."
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    It is the measure that is justified (or not), not fraud or anything else. The words are fine.

    It would be a lot easier to discuss if you told us where this was from, and what is being talked about.
     

    Evamiao

    New Member
    Chinese
    It is the measure that is justified (or not), not fraud or anything else. The words are fine.

    It would be a lot easier to discuss if you told us where this was from, and what is being talked about.
    Thanks for your reply, this sentence is from the attached article, i appreciate you could give me more explanation.
     

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    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Perhaps you are misinterpreting the meaning of "measure". This not about measuring anything, it is about taking action to prevent fraud. They are saying that if taking any such action is likely to cost more than what the fraud is costing, then it is not worth taking the action.

    The fraud is not a problem that is serious enough that taking measures against it would be justified.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    The type of measure being talked about is described in paragraph A, where the laboratory convened an external investigation panel which resulted in the person being found guilty of misconduct and sacked.

    I imagine that conducting the investigation cost both time and money.

    In your original quote, the writer is saying that fraud (in science) is in most cases not a serious enough problem to be worth spending a lot of time and money investigating. "Any measure" is wider in scope than investigation, but I expect that the writer is thinking mostly about investigating cases of suspected fraud.
     

    Evamiao

    New Member
    Chinese
    Perhaps you are misinterpreting the meaning of "measure". This not about measuring anything, it is about taking action to prevent fraud. They are saying that if taking any such action is likely to cost more than what the fraud is costing, then it is not worth taking the action.

    The fraud is not a problem that is serious enough that taking measures against it would be justified.
    Perhaps you are misinterpreting the meaning of "measure". This not about measuring anything, it is about taking action to prevent fraud. They are saying that if taking any such action is likely to cost more than what the fraud is costing, then it is not worth taking the action.

    The fraud is not a problem that is serious enough that taking measures against it would be justified.
    one more question, "measure" means actions preventing fraud, do you say "justify any measure"or "justify by using any measure"? Thanks
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    You appear to misunderstand how the verb "justify" works. It is a transitive verb (almost without exception, I think) and means that the the subject of the verb makes the object of the verb a reasonable/permissible/just/right/appropriate thing (to do). The object is often something that is not usually considered reasonable/permissible/just/right:
    Being attacked with a knife justifies killing your attacker.​

    Your quote uses the to-infinitive, which makes things a little more difficult to analyse, but "any measure" (investigating fraud) is clearly the thing that the writer is saying is not appropriate, so this is the object in the active voice. The clause could be re-written so "justify" is a main verb:
    Academic fraud does not generally justify any measure that would cost significant time or money.​
     

    Evamiao

    New Member
    Chinese
    You appear to misunderstand how the verb "justify" works. It is a transitive verb (almost without exception, I think) and means that the the subject of the verb makes the object of the verb a reasonable/permissible/just/right/appropriate thing (to do). The object is often something that is not usually considered reasonable/permissible/just/right:
    Being attacked with a knife justifies killing your attacker.​

    Your quote uses the to-infinitive, which makes things a little more difficult to analyse, but "any measure" (investigating fraud) is clearly the thing that the writer is saying is not appropriate, so this is the object in the active voice. The clause could be re-written so "justify" is a main verb:
    Academic fraud does not generally justify any measure that would cost significant time or money.​
    i see, thank you very much!!!
     
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