a shop takes something back

五加皮

New Member
chinese
A shop/store takes something back = you return something that you have bought there

I don't understand why the sentences are same. But if it, here,is "you take something back to shop", I can understand.

Why "a shop/store takes something back" = "you return something that you have bought there "?
 
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  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "You take something back to the shop' means you return something to the shop - it's faulty, or the wrong size, for instance.

    The shop then 'takes it back' from you. They accept it back into their stock - and either refund the money you paid for it, or replace it with another item.
     
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    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    >> A shop/store takes something back = you return something that you have bought there

    They are related, but not the same.

    When you take something (a good) back to the shop, this means that you convey it there hoping the shop will refund your money. The shop may not necessarily accept the good and refund your money, ie. the shop may not take it back.

    When a shop takes something (a good) back, it means that the shop has accepted to refund your money in return for the unwanted good.

    Sometimes, often in fact, once a good has been returned to the shop, and the shop has accepted to refund the cost of the good, customers will say, 'I took it back (to the shop)', but this is a kind of verbal short cut. (Cross-posted)
     
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