a side of pork/beef

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  • kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    A side of bacon in normal American usage for most people would be a reference to a side order of bacon added to your breakfast order in a restaurant. It might be three or four strips.

    This picture is labeled "A side of bacon":
    side-of-bacon.jpg
     
    Last edited:

    Minnesota Guy

    Senior Member
    American English - USA
    In the usage I'm familiar with, a "side of beef" is half a carcass, as in #2. If an individual buys a side of beef, it is typically cut into smaller cuts by the butcher. That is a very large amount of beef, so some of the cuts may be frozen and eaten later. I don't recall hearing about a "side of pork" in this way, but I suppose it's possible.

    Not sure if that answers the question in #1 -- so much depends on context. :)
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    I am sure I am not the only person reading this who is instantly reminded of the opening lines of the play Arcadia, by Tom Stoppard. Thomasina, the 13-year old daughter of an aristocratic English family is being tutored by Septimus Hodge, a 22-year old recent graduate of the University of Cambridge. The year is 1809:
    Thomasina: Septimus, what is carnal embrace?​
    Septimus: Carnal embrace is the practice of throwing one's arms around a side of beef.​
    Thomasina: Is that all?​
    Septimus: No ... a shoulder of mutton, a haunch of venison well hugged, an embrace of grouse ... caro, carnis; feminine; flesh.​

    I mention this, not only because I enjoy this play immensely, but it gives some indication of the size of a side of beef. It is something that a person could throw their arms around, something fairly substantial. As Edinburgher puts it:
    I would take it to mean a half carcass, cleaned of guts, and with the skin removed.
    It would also be missing the lower parts of the legs. Sides of beef are usually hung vertically from hooks, ideal for carnal embrace, if that is what takes your fancy. :)
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    A whole side of bacon was hanging from a hook on the ceiling.
    This is the same meaning for side of bacon that tunaafi referred to in post #9.

    A side of bacon in normal American usage for most people would be a reference to a side order of bacon added to your breakfast order in a restaurant.
    This is a different meaning for side of bacon. There really isn't any disagreement here, Raymond. It is not reasonable to believe that three strips of bacon would be hanging from a hook for any reason. :rolleyes:
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Most people in the U.S. never see a side of bacon hanging from a hook in their whole life. That's a specialty for butchers. The average person wouldn't have any experience with that.

    So again, context is very important.
     
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